Capital Report: 02-15-2019

Feb 15, 2019

Thursday’s joint meeting of the Florida House Judiciary Committee and Criminal Justice Subcommittee brought up questions about the logistics of implementing Florida’s new Amendment 4. Ryan Dailey reports election supervisors still have questions.

After Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission bundled its proposals on the November ballot—often linking seemingly unrelated items, like indoor vaping and offshore drilling—lawmakers want some changes. Regan McCarthy reports on two bills. One would limit the commission to making single subject proposals and the other would get rid of the board completely.

As Florida lawmakers grapple with changes to the state’s medical marijuana rules, others are questioning how hemp fits into the picture. Hemp is a marijuana plant, but is low in THC—meaning it doesn’t get people high. Instead, people say the CBD from the plant can have significant health benefits. But the two products come plants that look and smell the same—making regulation and enforcement difficult and leaving hemp use and sales in something of a legal grey area.      Florida Public Radio’s Blaise Gainey spoke with Cannabis legal expert Michael Minardi and Alex Petrick who manages Natural Life, a shop in Tallahassee that sells CBD products.

Jim Murdaugh, the president of Tallahassee Community College, will be spending a lot of time at the Florida Capitol over the next few months.  That’s because he’s the top governmental advocate for the state’s twenty-eight colleges and he shared his Session outlook with Tom Flanigan.

One year after the Parkland massacre that left 17 dead, and many more wounded, pain and grief clouded the usually-cheery Valentine’s Day. Communities across the state took a moment to remember the lives lost. But Shawn Mulcahy reports advocates also made their voices heard once again. We want to express our deepest appreciation to member stations WLRN in Miami and WGCU in Fort Myers for their sonic contributions to this report.

This evening at 9 public television stations across Florida will air an award-winning documentary called "Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope." It's being shown partly to honor the victims and survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas tragedy. And it's partly an attempt to prevent violence and other trauma from metastasizing into mental or physical illness. Margie Menzel reports.

Copyright 2019 WFSU. To see more, visit WFSU.