Invasive Species

Mark Mummaw / Tree Hill Nature Center

Northeast Florida residents are asked to help remove an invasive plant species Saturday.

The Army Corps of Engineers is holding  “air potato roundups” in various parks and gardens to kick off National Invasive Species Awareness Week, beginning March 3.


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Riverside residents near the Cummer Museum's termite-infested Women’s Club Building might want to have their homes inspected for the wood devouring pests.

The nearly 100-year old structure is riddled with Formosan Subterranean Termites to such a degree that it will have to be torn down.

The New York Times has this profile of some of the wildlife biologists in South Florida who are attempting to stop the spread of invasive Argentine black and white tegu lizards.

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The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission gave final approval Wednesday to a ban on imports of lionfish to Florida. 

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A local group is taking to the water to help kill an invasive species that has infiltrated the waters of the First Coast.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Sightings of giant tiger prawn are growing more numerous along the coastlines of Duval and St. Johns Counties.

The prawns, also known as Black or Asian Tiger Shrimp, can grow longer than a foot and weigh as much as a pound-and-a-half.

The fact that the shrimp aren’t native to the U.S. concerns ecologists, according to Carli Segelson with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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MIAMI (AP) — Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam says they're making great strides in the fight against the Giant African Land Snail.

During a news conference in Miami Thursday, Putnam said Florida sees a lot of strange things, but these snails are at the top of the list.

Editor's note: In the hunt for what to do about the various mix of invasive species found in Florida, we are running a series that not only describes the problems caused by these plants and animals but, well, offers a culinary solution. Tweet us (@WLRN) your ideas and tips or email us a recipe: WLRNMIA@gmail.com.

Rat-Sized, Housing-Eating Snails Invade South Florida

Apr 15, 2013
Reuters, Florida Department of Agriculture

(Reuters) - South Florida is fighting a growing infestation of one of the world's most destructive invasive species: the giant African land snail, which can grow as big as a rat and gnaw through stucco and plaster.

More than 1,000 of the mollusks are being caught each week in Miami-Dade and 117,000 in total since the first snail was spotted by a homeowner in September 2011, said Denise Feiber, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.