WJCT News

City of Jacksonville

Driving In Downtown Jacksonville This Weekend? Planning, Patience Required

The Jacksonville Jazz Festival, the inaugural concert at Daily’s Place amphitheater and a Jumbo Shrimp home stand at the baseball grounds will make getting around downtown more difficult than usual this Memorial Day weekend.

Read More

Patient, Doctor Groups Say New CBO Score Reveals Health Care Bill's Flaws

Health care groups that represent doctors and patients are warning members of Congress that the House Republicans' plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would hurt people who need insurance most. The groups are responding to the latest assessment by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which concluded that the proposed American Health Care Act would leave 23 million more people without health insurance than under current law and would cut the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years....

Read More

Local News

City of Jacksonville

The Jacksonville Jazz Festival, the inaugural concert at Daily’s Place amphitheater and a Jumbo Shrimp home stand at the baseball grounds will make getting around downtown more difficult than usual this Memorial Day weekend.

After a contentious legislative session, Florida lawmakers in early May finally agreed on an $83 billion state budget.


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Ridership is increasing on Jacksonville’s St. Johns River Ferry. The future of the ferry had been uncertain until the public Jacksonville Transportation Authority took over ownership last year.

Nineteen vehicles were lined up waiting to board at Mayport Friday afternoon. John Wilson and his wife visiting from Georgia were relaxing with the windows down while they waited.


  Today on “First Coast Connect,” it was our weekly media roundtable with Florida Times-Union columnist Mark Woods, A.G. Gancarski from Florida Politics, Daily Record reporter David Cawton and Jacksonville Free Press contributing writer Charles Griggs (01:05). We also heard about a movement to bring more book fairs to Jacksonville schools with Ellen Wiss from Read USA and Karen Sawyer (31:28)  from Scholastic books, and folk singer and Jacksonville native Tom Shed (45:42) told us about this weekend’s Florida Folk Festival.  

   

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

At least 700 people streamed into Jacksonville National Cemetery on Jacksonville’s Northside Thursday to stake armfuls of American flags in the ground next every tombstone.

Robert Willen was walking on soggy turf among the tombstones of 11,467 veterans and their family members buried at the cemetery, run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.  


More News

Sign up for WJCT First Read

Get the most important stories from WJCT News and NPR delivered straight to your inbox every weekday morning and breaking news when it happens

Follow WJCT on Twitter

Podcast

WJCT News Podcast

National News

Two owners of diesel-powered General Motors vehicles are accusing the car maker of producing an engine that exceeds U.S. standards for pollutant emissions under normal driving conditions, in a lawsuit that targets more than 700,000 Silverado trucks and Sierra SUVs.

The class-action lawsuit accuses GM of using "at least three separate 'defeat devices' to increase engine power and efficiency" in its Duramax diesel engines, citing tests on vehicles during several minutes of driving as well as at temperatures outside of the certification range of 68-86 degrees Fahrenheit.

Attack On Coptic Christians Kills At Least 28 In Egypt

21 hours ago

Updated 5:40 p.m ET

Gunmen attacked buses that were taking Egyptian Christians to a monastery Friday, killing at least 28 people and wounding about the same number, according to local reports citing Egypt's government.

In retaliation, NPR's Jane Arraf reports, "President Abdul Fatah al-Sisi says he ordered strikes near Derna in eastern Libya after determining that militant forces there were involved in Friday's attack. [Egypt] hit the same area two years ago after an Islamic State affiliate beheaded 21 Egyptian Christians in Libya."

Health care groups that represent doctors and patients are warning members of Congress that the House Republicans' plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would hurt people who need insurance most.

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

Candidate Donald Trump called NATO “obsolete,” demanded allies step up their defense spending and threatened to back out of the alliance.

President Trump has since walked back his remarks. He’s meeting with NATO leaders for the first time in Brussels on Thursday, and some member countries are still bracing for another unexpected pivot from a man who’s become known for his impulsive comments and decision-making.

More News

Jacksonville Bicycle-Pedestrian Advisory Committee is urging area residents to be mindful when driving as Jacksonville is one of the nation’s largest cities with the highest number of pedestrian deaths.

Wikimedia Commons

Governor Rick Scott is feeling the heat from school boards and superintendents across Florida to veto a massive package of education bills, which center around the issue of school choice. We’ll talk to folks on both sides of the debate. 

And, Duval County Schools has identified an interim superintendent even though it’s current superintendent hasn’t left just yet. We have the latest.

Then, we’ll visit one Jacksonville school teacher who, through sharing her love of reading with her students, is inspiring the next generation of literary artists. Also, a settlement is in sight after years of litigation in a housing discrimination against the city.

And finally, commercial space travel might soon be just an hour away for Jacksonville residents. But first, freshman Congressman John Rutherford is back in the spotlight. Find out why on Redux.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry and other city officials Thursday celebrated the opening of a new factory on Jacksonville’s Westside. The Hans-Mill garbage can company plans to create more than 50 local jobs, said CEO James Han.


Tiffany Salameh

Fifty four objects are strung together to tell the story of Islamic and Middle Eastern culture in the Cummer Museum of Art and Garden’s new exhibit, “Ink, Silk, and Gold: Islamic Treasures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.”

Nearly 200 high-achieving students from Raines and Ribault high schools will be honored by their Northwest Jacksonville community Friday night.

Thursday on “First Coast Connect,” we discussed if Governor Rick Scott should veto the school funding bill HB 7069 with Duval County School Board member Becki Crouch and Lynn Norman-Teck (01:21), executive director of the Florida Charter School Alliance. We heard about the increased dangers of Lyme disease in Florida with Kerry Clark, professor of epidemiology and environmental health at the University of North Florida and Dr. Shirley Hartman (29:58 ), a local clinician specializing in lyme disease. Christina Parrish with the Springfield Preservation and Revitalization Council joined Kerry Speckman (45:15) to talk about some of the big events this weekend. 


Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT

Mayport Naval Station in Jacksonville hosted a ceremony Wednesday marking the 30th anniversary of the attack on the USS Stark that killed 37 sailors.

News4Jax

Repairs to the Jacksonville Beach Pier, which was heavily damaged by Hurricane Mathew in October, is expected to take at least two years to complete, but city officials said Wednesday they hope part of the landmark will reopen this fall.

Ray Hollister / WJCT News

A settlement between disability rights nonprofits, the Department of Justice and Jacksonville is well on its way to becoming law after passing its final City Council committee this Tuesday.

The full council is expected next week to approve the agreement that helps the city avoid trial for violating the federal Fair Housing Act.


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

The Duval County School Board unanimously voted Wednesday to hire Patricia Willis, who has a 35-year history with the district, as temporary superintendent.

Willis, a Jacksonville native, has been a Duval teacher, principal, district professional development director and deputy superintendent. After retiring in 2012, she earned a doctorate degree and was an education consultant in Florida and Georgia.


Pages