Health

Last year, the Texas legislature approved a $350 million cut in Medicaid reimbursement rates to early childhood intervention therapists and providers. The cuts, made to help balance a billion dollars in property tax relief, affect the most vulnerable Texas children — those born extremely prematurely or with Down syndrome or other genetic conditions that put them at risk for developmental delay.

As customers this week begin shopping for 2017 health insurance on HealthCare.gov and state exchanges, which is a better buy, overall: a bronze plan, or silver? And will the IRS go after taxpayers next year who don't repay the subsidies they got — but didn't ultimately qualify for — in 2016? Here are the answers to some recent questions from readers.

It's hard for Zachary Lane to wake up in time for school every day.

"I have four alarms set and it still takes me a long time to wake me up," says Lane, a 17-year-old high school junior in Zionsville, Ind.

He says he regularly gets detention for being tardy. "I get to school and I'm talked to like I'm attempting to skip school — like I'm attempting to be truant," he says. "I feel terrible. It's awful."

And when Lane does make it to class on time, he has a hard time focusing.

"I feel kind of like lagging behind myself," he says. "I don't feel totally there."

Updated Nov. 9, 2016: Proposition 60 was defeated by a margin of nearly 54 percent against and 46 percent in favor, with 99 percent of California precincts reporting.


When Mike Stabile first moved to Los Angeles in 2011, he was struck by a freeway billboard that showed a line of cocaine and an overturned shot glass. The caption read: "You know why. Free HIV test."

A bomb goes off. It's noisy. It's smoky. Lights are flashing, people are shouting. The wounded are bloody and dying. But this isn't a real war zone. It's a training class inside a simulator in San Antonio that recreates the real-life chaos and pressure of combat.

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