Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Some 34,000 Leon County Students headed back to school Monday and with a new school year comes changes, mostly related to school safety.

The Leon County Classroom Teachers Association is backing three people for school board races including two newcombers.

Two candidates are teaming up to unseat the longest-serving members of the Leon County School Board.  In a joint campaign ad, candidates Marcus Nicolas and Darryl Jones say not all students are getting an equal education.

For the first time in Florida A&M University’s 130-year history, a woman will help lead it’s storied marching band. 

Lively Technical Center is out with a new program to bridge the skills gap in the local construction industry. It follows a recent Florida Chamber of Commerce survey showing employers continue to worry about not funding enough skilled workers.

Once upon a time, the Red Wolf roamed the south and eastern United States, from Texas to Pennsylvania. Today, there are fewer than 40 wolves left in the wild. The species is what’s called “functionally extinct”— with most of the remaining 200 or so wolves in captivity. The Trump administration is proposing changes to the Endangered Species Act that conservationists worry, could end what little protection the Red Wolf has left.

The Leon County School District is grappling with how to address relationships between employees. The recent administrative changes at Gilchrist Elementary school coupled with the removal of its principal has brought the issue to light. 

The Leon County School District has named new principals for Gilchrist Elementary and Deerlake Middle Schools. 

Leon High School is under investigation into whether it violated the state’s mandatory sexual assault reporting laws. 

Florida lawmakers continue to be frustrated with the state Department of Health over its slow implementation of medical marijuana rules. 

The concerns of teachers are shaping Leon County’s School Board District Five race. At issue is how much control education have over what they teach. The debate comes at a time when public schools are facing greater competition.

The League of Women Voters of Florida is suing to block a constitutional amendment that could pave the way for more charter schools. The League says the ballot summary-which voters see on the actual ballot—is different from the language in the amendment, and is vague and misleading.

Attorney Ron Meyer is representing the League in the lawsuit. He’s also representing the state teachers union in a case against a Florida that targets the Florida Education Association. Lynn Hatter spoke with Meyer about both lawsuits, starting with the case against Amendment Eight. It’s comprised of three proposals—term limits for local school board members, and mandatory civics education. But it’s the language regarding school district oversight of public schools, that’s triggered the suit.

The League of Women Voters of Florida wants a constitutional amendment it says is misleading removed from the November ballot. The target is Amendment Eight which critics say could lead to the creation of more charter schools.

The League’s Attorney Rom Meyer says the ballot summary of Amendment Eight is vague and doesn’t tell voters the main purpose of the proposal.

Growth, development and infrastructure are rising to the top of the priority list for the candidates who want to represent the Northwest corridor of Leon County. The County's Third District is up for grabs this year. 

Florida’s statewide teacher’s union is once again suing the legislature—this time over a new law that could directly impact its membership. It’s the latest in a line of lawsuits filed over the state’s education policies.

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