Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Florida State University police have arrested a second fraternity member accused of selling drugs on campus. The move comes a day after the school announced more arrests for drug sales would be forthcoming.

Florida State University is suspending all of its fraternities and sororities indefinitely after the recent death of a fraternity pledge and the arrest of a member for selling drugs.

The National Weather Service has issued Tropical Storm and Hurricane warnings for the Big Bend, Southwest Georgia and the Florida Panhandle. The warnings come as Hurricane Irma creeps closer to the state, preparing to make landfall somewhere in Southwest Florida.

Governor Rick Scott is asking for party unity ahead of the Republican Nominating convention later this summer. In a facebook post, Scott reiterated his support for Donald Trump, and is asking state Republicans to do the same.

A new poll of North Florida’s Fifth Congressional District shows Jacksonville-based Congresswoman Corrine Brown with a five-point lead over her challenger, former state Senator Al Lawson.

North Florida’s famous Apalachicola oysters are still under harvest limits. The crop has been devastated in recent years due to low water flow, and high salinity levels.

Florida’s Wildlife Commission will decide in June how to manage future bear hunts. Last year, the state held its first hunt in more than 30 years, with more than 300 bears killed.

Governor Rick Scott has approved a controversial bill restricting state funding to organizations that provide elective abortions. The measure is similar to a law in Texas pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Changes could soon be on the way when it comes to how the state administers dental services in its Medicaid Managed Care program.  Dental care could be re-established as an independent service in the state’s Medicaid program.

Florida is poised to become the first state to allow computer coding to fulfill a foreign-language requirement in high school. In a competitive job market, the thinking goes, computer skills are as important as speaking another language.

At SAIL High School in Tallahassee, a 3-D printer whirs away. It's turning PVC pipe into a red, Lego-like piece for a robot.

This is the OctoPiRates robotics club. These students will soon compete in a national contest with their hand-built robot. It features a square, metal frame with eight rubber wheels and a scooping arm.

It’s the second time around for a bill that would allow Florida students to attend the public school of their choice. But unlike last year, when the measure was first introduced, this year’s effort is bringing sharp critiques from Democrats.

Former Senate president Don Gaetz says Medicaid Expansion is a dead issue for the next three to five years.  The Senator says lawmakers are now focused on what he calls second tier healthcare plans.

Supporters of the state’s corporate tax scholarship program will gather at the Capitol. They’ve pushed the state teachers union to drop its lawsuit against the program that gives scholarships to low income kids to attend private school. Florida has become one of the nation’s hot spots for school choice programs. While many ideas may have originated in other states, Florida has adopted them and created a massive alternative system.

Recent racial unrest and turmoil is causing states and municipalities, mostly in the South to reconsider their Confederate flag displays. Now Florida lawmakers have introduced bills curtailing where the Confederate battle flag can be shown. But  not everyone wants that flag taken down.

Federal health officials are making their final push to get more people signed up for subsidized health insurance.  So far more than 8.6 million new and returning consumers have applied for health insurance on federal exchanges.

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