Confederate Monuments

After a few days of black activists demanding St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver denounce and stop advertising with a blogger who sent a racist email to a subscriber, Shaver said she’s discontinued their professional relationship and condemned the “name calling.” 

Our weekly Friday Media Roundtable on First Coast Connect featured guest host A.G. Gancarski from FloridaPolitics.com. Our panelist were:

  • Florida Times-Union reporter Tessa Duvall
  • WJCT contributor Fred Matthews
  • Jacksonville Daily Record reporter David Cawton
  • WJCT reporter Ryan Benk (01:11).

Issues discussed included:

Ebyabe / Wikimedia Commons

The St. Augustine City Commission meets Monday evening and on the agenda is a presentation by the Confederate Monument Committee.

Via News Service of Florida

After spending nearly a century in the nation’s capital, Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith is moving to Tavares.

Lynsey Weatherspoon / NPR

On June 19, the national anniversary celebrating of the end of slavery, Jacksonville City Council President Anna Lopez Brosche said she intends to file legislation setting up a strategy for the city to claim a piece of its painful history. In many southern cities, the celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Bill Bortzfield / WJCT News

The March for Change will start in Jacksonville and make its way to Saint Augustine, beginning Thursday morning in downtown Hemming Park.

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Tuesday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Ben Frazier of the Northside Coalition of Jacksonville and Wells Todd with the Jacksonville Progressive Coalition about the March for Change.

It’s a three-day march from Jacksonville to St. Augustine to call for the removal of Confederate monuments from public places on the First Coast (01:02).

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Thursday on First Coast Connect we spoke Tallahassee Mayor and Democratic candidate for Governor Andrew Gillum (01:17).

Our periodic commentator Jay Solomon spoke about the controversy around removing Confederate monuments on the First Coast (39:57).

We heard about this weekend’s Mandarin Art Festival with Show Manager Krysten Bennett (46:00).

Via News Service of Florida

Gov. Rick Scott on Monday signed 30 bills into law, including a measure that could make more permanent a controversial pregnancy “support services” program and a bill that calls for placing a statue of civil-rights leader and educator Mary McLeod Bethune in the U.S. Capitol.

Photo provided by The News Service of Florida

A statue of civil-rights leader Mary McLeod Bethune is halfway to its supporters’ goal of replacing the likeness of a Confederate general as a representative of Florida in the U.S. Capitol.

WJCT

Thursday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Northside Coalition of Jacksonville members Ben Frazier and Wells Todd about their upcoming rally calling for the removal of Confederate monuments from public places on the First Coast (01:14).  

We were also joined by Sharika Cunningham, assistant director of Stompdown, which is coming to the Florida Theatre Saturday (46:00). 


Wikimedia Commons

Those wanting to join a committee looking into how to “re-contextualize” St. Augustine’s only city-controlled Confederate monument have until the end of the month to apply.

Michael Rivera / Wikimedia Commons

A St. Augustine pastor is organizing a protest during the kickoff party for one of the city’s most attended annual events — Nights of Lights.

The AME Reverend Ron Rawls is voicing displeasure with a recent city decision to keep Confederate monuments in public spaces.

The choice of nights to protest the decision is no coincidence.


Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons

A statue of civil-rights leader and educator Mary McLeod Bethune is getting support in both chambers of the Legislature as a replacement for a Confederate general who has long represented Florida in the U.S. Capitol.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

As Jacksonville residents grapple with whether to remove the city’s Confederate monuments a group of area high school students are offering a more conciliatory alternative to the normally fractious debate among adults.


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