Mental Health

Medicaid Mental Health Deal With State May Result In More Options For Some First Coast Residents

Sep 5, 2018
Alex Proimos / Flickr via Wikimedia Commons

Patients with serious mental illness may have an increased choice of health-care providers under an agreement between the state and one of the largest Medicaid mental-health plans.

Bruce Lipsky / Florida Times-Union

Wednesday on First Coast Connect we learned about the plans for The Florida Times-Union newsroom to join a union with reporters Andrew Pantazi and Tessa Duvall (01:03).

Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT News

Next school year the Duval County School District could employ double the current number of therapists. That’s part of its plan to strengthen mental health services for students under the state’s school safety bill passed after February’s Parkland shooting.

Wiki Media Commons & WJCT News

There’s no widespread system of care for mental health patients in Florida.

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Tuesday on First Coast Connect we discussed Equal Pay Day with Paula Liang, Ellen Wiss and Melanie Patz from the Women’s Giving Alliance (01:12).  

Our latest segment of Moveable Feast featured Dea Sims from Your Pie (29:19).

This month’s First Coast Connect Bookclub with blogger Stacy Goldring featured the novel An Unnecessary Woman. (31:51).

We heard about this weekend’s Mosaic 2018 with organizers Jeanine Hoff from Where’s the Sunshine? and Carmen Joyce of I Still Matter (46:00).    

Wokandapix / Pixabay Creative Commons

Florida lawmakers are debating several measures aimed at preventing mass shootings, and some law enforcement officials are calling for another one: Making it easier to detain certain people suffering from mental illness.

But the leader of the state’s largest psychologist lobbying group cautions that unfairly puts too many people in the crosshairs.

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Thursday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Jacksonville City Councilman Tommy Hazouri on the issues that affected Jacksonville and City Hall this year (00:52).

Terri Andrews, administrator for Baptist Behavioral Health, and registered nurse Carol Whitefield talked about a initiative to train over 10,000 residents in three years in mental health first aid (35:23).    

Local attorney John Phillips talked about how to avoid identity theft during the holidays (46:00). 

Thursday on Faith Matters on 89.9 WJCT host Kyle Reese, senior pastor of Hendricks Avenue Baptist Church and One Jax Executive Director Nancy Broner and their guests discussed the role of faith in mental health treatment


Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT

Jacksonville mental health providers want to make sure there are enough clinicians, so they're donating nearly $1 million to the University of North Florida to train psychiatric nurse practitioners.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Health professionals from several Jacksonville hospitals are launching a project to train thousands of people to recognize the signs of mental illness, which can help reduce harmful stigma and get people connected to treatment faster.

But Florida’s lack of mental healthcare resources is still a hurdle.


Mental Health Resource Center

A Duval County mental health care program is set to begin treating patients in March, five months ahead of schedule.

The nonprofit in charge of creating the “central receiving system” is raising money to qualify for a $15 million state grant. But it’s not waiting to reach that goal before opening doors to patients.


Monday on “First Coast Connect,” guest host Ryan Benk spoke with Dr. Bob Sommers, CEO of the Mental Health Resource Center in Jacksonville.

He also spoke with local attorneys Barry Newman and Keith Maynard from the Spohrer & Dodd law firm about their work helping families of the victims of air crashes. This month’s installment of “First Coast Success” with Karen Brune Mathis featured InMotion President Jeremy Smith, and Cole Pepper talked about the Jaguars’ firing head coach Gus Bradley on Sunday after another disappointing loss to the Texans. 


               

JCCI

Duval County mental health advocates are celebrating the state Legislature’s moderate progress this year toward reforming Florida’s mental-health system.


wired_gr / Flickr

Duval County high-school students are reporting higher-than-average rates of suicide attempts and feelings of hopelessness.

Superintendent Nikolai Vitti addressed the report at Tuesday’s board meeting in a presentation. He said the district will be advocating for more mental health funding, and plans to expand services.


waiting room chairs
Christina Welsh via Flickr

Jacksonville is set to open what’s called a mental-health “central receiving system” next July. It’s a way to divert people with mental illness from jail, and it will give people in crisis a short-term treatment option.

But the project still needs $1.5 million dollars in local funding before it can become a reality.

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