Pension

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

After it passed the Jacksonville City Council unanimously, Mayor Lenny Curry signed into law Tuesday the biggest policy priority of his administration: pension reform.


City of Jacksonville

The Jacksonville City Council passed Mayor Lenny Curry’s pension-reform plan Monday.

Though some members admit it isn't a silver bullet for all of the city’s funding problems, all agree it is the best plan they’ve seen because it includes a dedicated funding source — a half-cent sales tax that will cover pension costs after it was set to end in 2030.

In Curry’s closing remarks at the special council meeting, he issued a warning.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville City Council members got their first look at Mayor Lenny Curry’s pension reform plan Thursday.

Curry’s been tight-lipped about just how his half-cent sales tax and other reform measures would save the city money.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Negotiations over how to reform Jacksonville’s public employee retirement plans continued Wednesday.


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A national financial watchdog group finds Jacksonville taxpayers would have to fork over more than $6,000 each to fully pay off the city’s debt.

Chicago-based Truth In Accounting is calling on city officials to be more transparent with their finances.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A month after Jacksonville voters passed a sales-tax extension to cover $2.85 billion in pension costs, city-employee unions are negotiating the terms of closing pension plans to new members.

Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Duval County voters delivered Mayor Lenny Curry a decisive victory Tuesday on one of his biggest priorities: extending a half-penny sales tax to help pay down pension debt.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry says he’s confident voters this month will approve his plan to deal with the city’s $2.7 billion pension debt.

The Republican mayor is pushing back against a contingent of Democratic opposition against the extension of a 1/2-cent sales tax.


Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Note: For Information about Duval County Referendum 1 on the November  ballot, go here. To read about the referendum that passed on the August ballot, continue reading. 

ballot language
News4Jax

A group opposed to Mayor Lenny Curry's plan to use a half-cent sales tax to pay down the city's pension deficit has filed a lawsuit against the amendment.

City of Jacksonville employees and their union leaders are endorsing the pension-tax referendum on this month’s ballot.

Beaches Residents React to Pension Proposal

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry says "we're all in this together" regarding the city's pension obligations, but some residents of the Beaches are skeptical.

Curry has been traveling around Duval County drumming up support for his proposed solution to Jacksonville’s massive unfunded pension liability.

But he’s facing a tough sell in Jacksonville, Atlantic and Neptune Beaches, where some residents are pushing back against the idea of extending a half-cent sales tax.

'Just Vote No'

A new lawsuit has been filed that seeks to knock that half-cent sales tax proposal for Jacksonville off the ballot in the upcoming August 30 primary election.

The lawsuit says the ballot language is too confusing and misleading, even illegal.

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry is leading the charge to get Duval County residents to vote “yes” on the measure to pay down the city’s massive pension debt. The mayor’s office says the referendum’s language meets all the requirements of state law.

Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Updated at 2:20 p.m.:   

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry unveiled an austere city budget Monday that “reflects the constraints that we face due to increasing pension costs.”

Many services are remaining at minimum levels, while nearly a third of the whole budget is going toward pension costs.


Curry
Pam Hinds / Facebook

A new University of North Florida poll of likely Duval County voters shows support for a pension tax plan is not universal.

Mayor Lenny Curry’s priority tax extension has support from just  41 percent of respondents.

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