politics

Provided by Mayor Lenny Curry's Office

Mayor Lenny Curry has appointed a longtime political strategist as his new Chief of Staff.


Gov. Rick Scott Says Roy Moore Should Exit Alabama's U.S. Senate Race

Nov 16, 2017
Associated Press and flgov.com

Gov. Rick Scott said Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, accused of sexually inappropriate behavior with girls as young as 14, should drop out of the race, according to the Austin American-Statesman newspaper.

Sen. Frank Artiles, R-Miami, is officially out of the Florida legislature. Artiles has resigned just days after saying that he would not not step down, and announcing plans to run for re-election.  He has been under fire for insulting his colleagues during a not-so-private conversation earlier in the week.

News4Jax

Recently ousted North Florida Congresswoman Corrine Brown appeared in a Jacksonville federal courtroom to update Judge James Klindt on what she’s done to establish stable representation in the fraud case against her.

NicoleKlauss / Flickr

Launching a local political campaign just got a little easier. At least, that’s what a platform called RunForOffice.org is promising.

Rick Wilson

Donald Trump is closing in on the Republican nomination for president after winning Tuesday's Indiana primary.

Ted Cruz officially ended his campaign after the election, leaving just Trump and Ohio Governor John Kasich still standing.

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders won the state of Indiana. However, Hillary Clinton still has a commanding delegate lead in that contest.

Mr. Trump is emerging as the standard bearer of a Republican Party that has been traumatized and torn apart by his campaign.

Primary Results

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton scored huge victories Tuesday in five more states, bringing them closer to a monumental duel for the White House later this year.

Trump had a clean sweep of races in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Clinton delivered big wins in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Connecticut.

Bernie Sanders picked up his sole victory of the night in Rhode Island.

Michael I Schiller / Reveal

Money in U.S. politics once was a straightforward thing. In 19th-century America, a politician running for office would pay to print ballots with his name on them and pay voters to cast them. The cost was about $2.50 per vote

Wikimedia Commons

Jacksonville is the fifth most politically conservative city in the U.S. That’s according to new research published in the American Political Science Review.

Researchers used data from close to 2,000 towns and cities to determine the country’s liberal and conservative hotspots.


Faith Matters: Religion And Politics

Feb 4, 2016

Does the separation of church and state mean that religion has no place in our political beliefs and actions?

On this edition of Faith Matters, hosts Nancy Broner and Kyle Reese explore the role of faith in the political process with local and national religious and political leaders.


Ted Cruz upset Donald Trump in last night’s first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses in a surprise victory.

On the Democrats’ side, Hillary Clinton wins a narrow victory over Bernie Sanders. Now the 2016 nomination fight is on to New Hampshire.

Political junkies here in the US are following the election closely, of course, but what you may not know is that the 2016 presidential election will be the biggest betting event of all-time.

Paul Krishnamurty, chief analyst for the world’s leading betting exchange, Betfair.com, and blogger at PoliticalGambler.com, has been successfully predicting elections since the turn of the century. In 2008, he backed both Barack Obama to become President and John McCain for the Republican nomination.

Krishnamurty early on called Ted Cruz for the GOP nomination, and has placed bets on Hillary Clinton as the slight favorite to win the presidency.

Paul Krishnamurty joins us to discuss how he thinks the 2016 election will play out following the Iowa caucus.


This week, NPR is partnering with WJCT and other member stations to take a close look at the state of mind of American voters heading into the 2016 election.

From growing economic uncertainty, to fears of terrorism, to worries about our identity as a nation, the mood of the voters this year is anxious, frightened and angry.

We discuss the electorate's state of mind with John Delaney, University of North Florida president and former Jacksonville mayor; Tonyaa Weathersbee, Florida Times-Union columnist; Matt Corrigan, UNF professor of political science; and A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics reporter.


Hillary Clinton officially announced her run for president in 2016 Sunday. We discuss the road ahead for her campaign and other candidates with A.G. Gancarski, columnist for Florida Politics and Folio Weekly.

WhiteHouse.gov

In his sixth State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Barack Obama made populist calls for increasing the minimum wage, instituting paid sick leave and passing equal pay legislation. He also pushed sweeping tax reform. We analyze the president's speech with Dr. Mike Binder, professor of political science and director Public Opinion Research Laboratory at UNF, and A.G. Gancarski, columnist for Folio Weekly.

Then Dr. David Zierden, state climatologist at FSU, joins us to discuss climate change concerns in Florida, as well as potential solutions.

Judge Strikes Down Medical Marijuana Rule

Nov 15, 2014

An administrative law judge Friday struck down a rule proposed by health regulators as a framework for Florida's new medical-marijuana industry, finding multiple flaws in the controversial rule challenged by the state's largest nursery and other growers.

Administrative Law Judge W. David Watkins sided with Miami-based Costa Farms and others that objected to the Department of Health's use of a lottery to pick five licensees that will grow, process and distribute strains of non-euphoric marijuana authorized by the Legislature and approved by Gov. Rick Scott earlier this year.

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