Science

Science news

Disease Threatens FL Roses

Aug 24, 2015

Florida’s $20 million rose industry is threatened by a disease that’s devastating the flower across the Eastern United States.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

St. Johns River advocates and museum goers attended a first-of-its-kind symposium Saturday at Jacksonville's Museum of Science and History.

The event was focused on shaping the next generation of river enthusiasts.

Author and self-described springs advocate Rick Kilby took the older crowd back to a simpler time, when Kilby said the springs surrounding the St. Johns River were as clear as the memories he has of summer swimming trips. Since then, he said Florida has been too successful at attracting new residents.

Georgia-Pacific

A new environmental education facility opened to the public in Palatka last month, inviting school groups to learn about wetlands and wildlife.

Some scientists who helped develop the center are questioning whether the manufacturer Georgia-Pacific had too much influence over its curriculum.


Kirk Olson / Ghost Crab

The health of the St. Johns River is generally improving, but scientists are concerned about some recent negative trends. Those are the takeaways from this year’s State of the River Report, presented Friday morning at the University of North Florida.

Lead scientists Radha Pyati and Lucinda Sonnenberg presented findings to a crowded ballroom at UNF’s Environmental Symposium. Sonnenberg, Director of the Millar Wilson Laboratory at JU, says the main takeaway is the need for more data.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Amateur Hour.

About Julia Sweeney's TED Talk

Actor and writer Julia Sweeney says parenting has always made her feel like an amateur — but especially when her 8-year-old started asking some smart questions about animal reproduction.

About Julia Sweeney

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