Ashley Lisenby

Ashley Lisenby is a general assignment reporter at WUSF Public Media. She covered racial and economic disparity at St. Louis Public Radio before moving to Tampa in 2019.

She's a former newspaper reporter, having covered municipal government issues as a general assignment reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and covered Illinois government for The Associated Press.

Ashley started her journalism career at a group of weekly newspapers in suburban Chicago. She has a master’s degree in public affairs reporting from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University.

Ashley is a Chicago native. She lives in the Tampa Bay area with her family, which includes a rambunctious dog. 

A crowd instantly formed around Ronald Seaman when they saw what he could do.

The masked man with pointy ears jutting up from the side of his helmet rolled his wheelchair into the lobby of the Robert W. Saunders Public Library, dressed head-to-toe in black and gold armor, holding a fake weapon with a pseudo-spear attached.

Then, suddenly, his chair elevated him to a standing position. Everyone stopped and stared.

Pride, determination, and unity are the key messages of the fifth annual Tampa Pride festival and parade, organizers say.

Tampa Pride President Carrie West said organizers also want to celebrate the achievements of LGBTQ advocates in the 50 years since the 1969 Stonewall Riots.

Law enforcement say changes in policies and technology are helping them find human traffickers.

Officials from the Tampa Police Department, Pasco County Sherriff's Office and the Department of Homeland Security discussed the advances in and challenges of finding victims of sex trafficking and their abusers at a conference at the University of South Florida in Tampa Tuesday.

Rosalva Serrano worked with her family as a girl picking oranges, tomatoes, cucumbers and other vegetables and fruits in Florida, Georgia and other parts of the south.

“I’ve learned so much from being a farm worker,” Serrano said, “It was the best time of my life because I learned so much and I shared so many wonderful memories with my family.”

Teams and costume-clad swimmers walked, ran and jumped into the 'cold' waters of Adventure Island on Saturday as part of the first Tampa Polar Plunge fundraiser for Special Olympics Florida. 

Three adult manatees and one calf have found a temporary home at ZooTampa at Lowry Park.

Zoo staff welcomed the arrival of the animals Thursday during media tours of the new facility, which was closed for several months for state-funded renovations totaling $3 million.

Gaps in commercial building permit records and inaccurate charges are among some of the findings in an audit of Pasco County’s Central Permitting office.

Tampa area Muslims are mourning the deaths of at least 49 people in attacks on a pair of mosques in New Zealand Friday.

Hassan Shibly, attorney and chief executive director at the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Tampa, took to social media early Friday morning to share his thoughts.

The message of former Starbucks Chief Executive Howard Schultz is clear: Americans are tired of partisan politics.

He told a group of business owners at a Thursday town hall hosted by the Tampa Bay Chamber of Commerce that his brand of politics could be the antidote to that apathy.

People who are homeless and those who earn lower incomes came to receive food, clothes and other social services at University Mall in Tampa on Tuesday.

U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota, says lawmakers cannot afford to ignore the environmental impacts of rising temperatures.

Dozens of riders from across Tampa biked to work on Thursday to show that cycling in the Bay area is good for personal health and the environment.

Florida could become the 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment if resolutions by Democratic state lawmakers are approved.

A Senate measure could make it easier for people to pass the Florida Teacher Certification Exam.

Lakeland commissioners will consider in coming weeks whether to close almost half of its voting precincts for the next municipal election.

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