Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated at 10:04 p.m. ET

More than 1,700 books began the autumn with a chance at winning a National Book Award. Now, after a swanky ceremony Wednesday night in Manhattan, the folks behind just five of those books have each emerged with a trophy, a purse of $10,000 and the right to slap that precious gold medallion on the front cover of their work.

The winners of the 70th annual National Book Awards are:

Picture, for a second, just how vast New York City is. All told, including Staten Island, the Bronx and every block in between, the massive metropolis takes up more than 300 square miles. Now, try to picture a hunk of land more than 12 times that size.

That's about how much of the Amazon rainforest was destroyed in just the span of a year, according to Brazilian authorities.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET

A global megacorporation best known for Band-Aids and baby powder is now on the hook for about $107 million less than originally anticipated over its role in Oklahoma's opioid crisis.

In a judgment filed Friday, state District Judge Thad Balkman revised an earlier ruling against Johnson & Johnson and told the drugmaker to make a onetime payment of $465 million — not the $572 million he had originally ordered.

In some ways, the fact that Behrouz Boochani touched down in New Zealand on his way to a literary festival is unremarkable. His memoir, No Friend but the Mountains, won Australia's richest literary prize earlier this year, after all, and presenting at such festivals is a pretty standard item on any celebrated writer's itinerary.

But this trip represented something unfamiliar for the Kurdish-Iranian journalist: his first glimpse of freedom in six years.

Take a quick scan of the 16 nominees for next year's Aspen Words Literary Prize, and you're likely to find that their dust jackets boast the stuff of international headlines. And that's the point: The annual award, which revealed its longlist Thursday, is intended to honor fiction that doesn't shy from the weightiest, thorniest of social issues today.

(You can jump to the full list by heading to Aspen's website or clicking here.)

Evo Morales may be out of the country, but he's not out of the picture.

Updated at 1:37 p.m. ET

Rocket fire rained from the sky across the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, leaving at least seven people dead in Gaza and dozens more injured on either side Tuesday. Among the dead was Bahaa Abu el-Atta, commander of a militant group in Gaza known as Palestinian Islamic Jihad, according to the Israel Defense Forces.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva is a free man once more.

On Friday, a judge ordered the release of Brazil's popular former president, who is better known simply as "Lula." The order was handed down just one day after the country's Supreme Court ruled that convicted defendants cannot be jailed until their appeals to higher courts have been exhausted.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Roughly five months since massive protests first spread through Hong Kong, unrest has flared anew after a student died of injuries sustained during a protest. Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died Friday of brain injuries he suffered in a fall as police dispersed protesters from a parking garage earlier this week.

Chow is believed to be the first person to die in violence directly related to the protests.

Editor's note: This story contains details of violence that some readers may find upsetting.

A notorious warlord whose activities in the Democratic Republic of Congo earned him the moniker "the Terminator" has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The International Criminal Court handed down the penalty for Bosco Ntaganda during a hearing Thursday at The Hague, Netherlands.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

In a blow to the Trump administration, a federal court in Manhattan has knocked down a rule that would make it easier for doctors and other health care workers to refuse care for religious reasons.

Israel's Supreme Court has upheld the government's decision to deport the regional director of Human Rights Watch. The high court's ruling Tuesday means that Omar Shakir, a U.S. citizen who oversees Israeli and Palestinian policy for the international rights monitor, can be removed under a 2017 law that bans foreigners who publicly call for boycotts of Israel or its West Bank settlements.

Shakir had been accused of supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement against Israel. He now has 20 days to leave the country if the government proceeds with deportation efforts.

E. Jean Carroll, the advice columnist who says President Trump sexually assaulted her more than two decades ago in a New York City department store, is suing the president for defamation.

For weeks, anti-government demonstrations have filled the streets of Baghdad and other Iraqi cities, with protesters calling for the ouster of Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi. Now, it appears they are about to get their wish: Iraqi President Barham Salih announced Thursday that the premier has agreed to step down and called for early elections.

In a surprise move, the NCAA says it intends to allow college athletes to earn compensation — but it says it's only starting to work out the details of how that would take place. The organization's board of governors said Tuesday that it had voted unanimously to permit student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.

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