Emily Long

Intern

WJCT News Intern Emily Long is a Communications Major, Marketing Minor at Jacksonville University. She is also News Editor of Jacksonville University's campus newspaper, The Navigator.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Sally Keiser

Sally Ann Keiser wants to bring sewing, which has been her passion since she was about 8-years-old, back to the First Coast.

Emily Long / WJCT

Several Jacksonville organizations are collaborating to clean and beautify the city's downtown in preparation of the One Spark festival, including Hemming Plaza.

Generation W Profiles is a series highlighting influential women on the First Coast. The project is a collaborative effort between WJCT and the Generation W Women’s Leadership Conference, which is scheduled for April 4, 2014.

Patti Hughes is the Founder, CEO and chief creative officer of Natural Life.

Emily Long / WJCT

It’s not a bird. It’s not a plane. It’s a monster, and it’s under your bed. Well, that’s what most children believe.

News4Jax

The fate of the alleged killer of 17-year-old Jordan Davis will soon be in the hands of a Duval County jury.

Jacksonville University

Jacksonville University’s speech-pathology program and College of Health Sciences have partnered to conduct innovative research on the ability of pilots to perform and communicate in crisis conditions.

Bethel Baptist Institutional Church / Facebook

For 47 years, Bishop Rudolph McKissick Sr. was at the pulpit every Sunday at Bethel Baptist Institutional Church in Jacksonville. This month he preached his last sermon as lead pastor.

Courtesy of Vardi Kahana

A powerful photography exhibit focused on several members of one family who survived the Holocaust is being shown exclusively in Jacksonville.

Garden Of Eatin' Plants / Facebook

Despite a society that seems to be more and more disconnected from the land, one local company is out to prove that you don't need a farm to get into gardening.

Valor Academy of Leadership

The graduation rate in Florida for male African American students is just under 60 percent. However, there’s a lot of momentum in Jacksonville aimed at closing the achievement gap.