Kate Stein

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read.
 

A new bill to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions is being introduced this week in the U.S. House of Representatives, and three of the five sponsors are from Florida.

Florida teachers are eager to teach kids about sea-level rise, rising heat and other impacts of climate change, but many say it can be hard to find engaging and in-depth information in their textbooks or the state curriculum.

A workshop on Wednesday offered about 30 Florida educators ideas and resources for climate education.

A poorly organized 911 system hampered the police response to the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

That’s one finding discussed on Tuesday by the public safety commission investigating the shooting.

On a hot day in September, Charlene Jones celebrated her 61st birthday by herself.

The former nursing-home cook made herself a birthday dinner of turkey and dressing, macaroni and cheese, string beans and butter pound cake. She ate it alone, in a dim apartment in an affordable housing complex in Miami’s West Little River neighborhood.

“I wanted to be home,” Jones said. “I don’t really like being out.”

Environmental groups and state water managers are sparring over land for an Everglades restoration project to help with Florida’s algae blooms, following a controversial vote last week by the governing board of the South Florida Water Management District.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is starting a three-year, $3 million study to help Miami-Dade County find ways to reduce risk from storms and sea-level rise.

On Thursday, the Corps and the county launched the effort by collecting ideas from local planners, researchers and concerned citizens. For four hours, staff members sat at tables in the Miami Rowing Club on Key Biscayne and facilitated conversations with interested members of the public.

Tens, hundreds or thousands of ideas are part of what’s needed to help South Florida respond to climate change.

If you’re not sure what to do with your yard signs now that the midterm elections are over, a South Florida artist has a suggestion for you.

Visual artist Xavier Cortada is leading a project to turn political yard signs into markers showing how high people’s homes are above sea level. The goal is to bring people together following the divisive 2018 midterms, and to raise awareness of how sea-level rise can impact South Florida -- from property values to insurance rates to tidal flooding and contamination of drinking water.

New leaders in Florida may mean new opportunities for the state’s energy policy, according to Hal Harvey, the head of a think tank called Energy Innovation and a co-author of a book called Designing Climate Solutions. The book looks at the most effective policies for limiting climate change and how to implement them. Harvey says there’s a lot that newly elected and re-elected leaders on state and local levels can do.

Midterm losses among moderate Florida Republicans have raised questions about the future of a climate caucus founded by two of the state's U.S. Congressmen.

The City of Boynton Beach will decide Wednesday night whether to become the latest Florida city to join a national coalition dedicated to sea-level rise adaptation.

In one of Florida’s most tightly contested U.S. House races, incumbent Republican Carlos Curbelo (District 26) was defeated by Democratic challenger Debbie Mucarsel-Powell.

In his concession speech, the outgoing congressman condemned political violence and called for bipartisanship.

“This country needs to heal,” he said. “If we don’t start respecting and appreciating each other again, even when we disagree, then it’s not going to matter who wins elections in the future.”

Florida is hot and may be trending hotter: 2015, 2017 and the early part of 2018 all set temperature records.

Grades are in for transportation in Miami-Dade County, and from this particular set of evaluators, they’re abysmal.

A proposed extension of the 836 expressway in Miami-Dade County is headed to court.

On Monday, two environmental groups each filed lawsuits over plans to extend the expressway 14 miles south into the Kendall area.

 

Read more: Does Miami-Dade's 836 Expressway Proposal Fit Into The Regional Climate Plan?

 

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