Lily Oppenheimer

Under a Missouri School of Journalism fellowship, I spent my last college semester in New York City editing and producing videos for Mic, an innovative news startup in One World Trade Center. After late nights of deadlines, finessing video pieces, bonding with coworkers and experimenting with editing techniques, I produced and filmed my own mini-documentary focusing on evolving Mic video strategies.

I’m a podcast junkie, I dabble in photography and I love walking for hours without a plan. Before traveling to New York, I anchored and produced morning newscasts for KBIA, an NPR-affiliate in Columbia, MO. During newsroom shifts interwoven with my past classes, I produced multimedia Missouri stories for KBIA, Vox Magazine, Newsy, The Reynolds Journalism Institute Futures Lab and the Columbia Missourian. I was also a project manager in the Reynolds Journalism Institute.

During my summer 2017 news internship with the Kansas City Star, I edited and produced features and investigative pieces with audio, video, photo and graphics alongside my writing.

I'm a musician, a dancer, and I love experimenting in the kitchen (even though those experiments usually end in disaster.) On the weekends you’ll find me in salsa clubs, playing piano, cooking chili, blasting my music, hiking and eating dark chocolate.

With the House impeachment inquiry against President Trump preparing for the first public hearings this Wednesday, South Florida veterans and their families shared what they thought about the political turmoil. 

During the city of Miami Beach’s annual Veteran’s Day Parade on Ocean Drive, many vets said they still continue to support President Trump.

Vietnam War veteran Charles McCoy is now 71, and was drafted when he was only 18 in 1966. 

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar opened her time at the latest 2020 Democratic presidential debates with the phrase,  “Houston, we have a problem.” 

Grilling President Trump for leading the country “like a game show” and saying he would rather “lie than lead,” she admitted to not being the loudest candidate for president in the last debate rounds. 

Smells of pikliz, arroz con pollo, Publix fried chicken and other homemade Miami potluck staples wafted out of the Adrienne Arsht Center as parents, guardians and friends  gathered to see a culmination of what their kids learned from the six-week-long immersive AileyCamp. 

“I absolutely sympathize with the comments that say the ratio of counselors to students in the state of Florida and nationally are inadequate,” said Miami-Dade Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho  during the school district’s first public budget hearing on Wednesday. 

“It is insufficient, it is a ratio that should not be accepted. We know the American Counseling Association recommends a ratio of 250 students for every one counselor, and we’re not at that. Nor is the state, nor is the country.” 

Sixteen-year-old Beatrix Alerte was shocked to learn last year that common cosmetic and beauty brands often use ingredients derived from animal products, like whale blubber and vomit (ambergris). 

One of her favorite parts of her beauty routine is jazzing up her lips - so she decided to research how to create a glamorous, sturdy lip gloss that is vegan and cruelty-free. Now, Alerte is expanding her plant-based gloss into a business, called Trixx Trendz.

Like many Venezuelan expats living in South Florida, Kendall resident Paola Berriros still has family and friends suffering under the authoritarian regime of president Nicolás Maduro. She fled Venezuela when the country's humanitarian crisis was brewing 15 years ago. 

Now Berriros' 6-year-old daughter, Karina, has learned to play piano, violin and sing under Musicall - a South Florida non-profit that gives children from all backgrounds access to music education. 

In a Fortune Article released earlier this week, Miramar Mayor Wayne Messam blasted the Democratic National Committee’s system he claims prevented him from qualifying for the first 2020 Democratic presidential debates. 

Messam, the son of Jamaican immigrants, grew up in rural South Bay, Florida. His father cut sugarcane as a contract farm worker, and his mother fed migrant field workers. 

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., was denied entry to the Homestead detention center for migrant children on Wednesday, just hours before the first debate of the 2020 election cycle in downtown Miami.

"I've got a plan." That's how Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren starts a lot of her sentences. It's also what many of her fans say resonates with them.

The American Black Film Festival, an annual event that brings together emerging black filmmakers and artists, wrapped up it’s last day in South Florida over the weekend.

Bishop  James Adams, of Overtown’s historic St. John’s Missionary Baptist Church, is no stranger to Miami redevelopment politics.

Over the last decade, while controversial mega developments have heightened fears of rapid gentrification in Miami, Adams has pushed to preserve Pan-Africanism in Overtown and has held developers accountable for promises of jobs

Fort Lauderdale residents Nico and Junior Acosta have been a couple for 22 years -- they have also witnessed an evolving and more LGBTQ-accepting Fort Lauderdale grow over their years together.

It’s a beautiful thing, they said along the Fort Lauderdale Beach during the last day of Pride Fort Lauderdale,  an annual celebration of the LGBTQ community.   

In Broward County, Valentine’s Day will never be the same.

On the one-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, teachers across Broward were determined not to focus on the shooting that killed 17 students on Feb. 14, 2018.

At Seminole Middle School, about 30 minutes from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, teacher Andrea McNiven guided students in activities for the district’s newly-designated "Day of Service and Love." Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie requested lessons about peace and love.

Some 100 South Florida middle schoolers powered up drones in the Adrienne Arsht Center’s Knight Concert Hall on Wednesday, turned on the ‘Cha Cha Slide’ and coordinated the machines so they flipped and turned along with the music. Other kids performed choreographed dances with the drones, tumbling into breakdancing. 

Carrying coladas, purse-sized puppies and mountains of luggage, passengers at the terminal of Miami International Airport rushed on Wednesday to board departing flights, going about their usual routines. Many ignored the members of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, also known as NATCA, standing in the middle of the chaos, passing out flyers.

Calle Ocho made way for three clomping camels on Sunday afternoon to celebrate Miami’s annual Three Kings Day Parade, also known as La Parada de los Reyes Magos

Sunrise resident Peggy Johannsen is grieving for her niece, who died unexpectedly last month. Her father also recently passed away. On top of expenses from two funerals, she also has a looming February mortgage payment. 

Heading into the third week of the partial government shutdown, President Donald Trump told reporters outside the White House that he can relate to the pain of federal workers who aren’t receiving paychecks.

“Many of those people that won’t be receiving a paycheck, many of those people agree 100 percent with what I’m doing,” he said.

Time is running out to save the world’s coral reefs from irreversible damage, according to numerous studies

The smell of steaming jelly doughnuts fried in oil carried through Lincoln Road on Sunday, the eighth and final night of Hanukkah festivities on Miami Beach.

Between improvised versions of ‘I Have A Little Dreidel’ and lighting the menorah, members of the Jewish community reflected on a challenging few months.

You tell yourself that you’ll only check Instagram at the red light, or change your Spotify while driving alone on cruise control through Alligator Alley.

But those few seconds can be deadly for South Florida drivers. In fact, distracted driving causes about 50,000 crashes per year in Florida, according to the state Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. 

The Miami Beach Convention Center has completed its three-year, $620-million renovation in time for the start of the annual international Art Basel festival.

There’s a movement building in Florida to take advantage of solar power and, according to Miami-Dade County Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava, it has reached a tipping point. 

“We are the sunshine state, and we’ve been a little in the clouds,” Cava laughed. “It’s time to come out.”

Last Sunday, Broward attorney and GOP State Committeeman Richard DeNapoli got a call from an employee at Avis Rent-A-Car in the Fort Lauderdale airport. Someone had found a lone provisional ballot box, sealed by the Broward Supervisor of Elections Office. It was sitting, unsupervised, in the back of a returned rental car.

The telenovela that is the Palm Beach County recount continued to unfold Thursday inside the Supervisor of Elections Office. Overheated and old machines, a lack of sleep for workers and last-minute vote discrepancies were to blame.

When asked by reporters about the looming deadline for the state recount, Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher told reporters that the “likelihood is slim” that the county will finish by 3 p.m. 

Nearly 100 supporters of Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis gathered outside Versailles in Little Havana Thursday as the former congressman made a last-minute stop just a few days before Election Day. 

Milly Gonzalez grew up in West Miami after escaping from Cuba with her family at only 5-years-old. She said she's voting for DeSantis because she's afraid socialism is taking over the country. 

“Coming from a socialist communist country, that we escaped, I don’t want that for this country,” she said, adding that her "main issue is abortion." 

After preaching to hundreds inside The Bethel Church last Sunday, Pastor Carlos Malone joined many members of his congregation making their way to the ice cream truck parked outside. The colorful vehicle often stops outside the Baptist church in Richmond Heights. 

Malone is 61-years-old, but doesn’t look it -- his eyes are jovial and excited. He said this church is one of the leading churches in the surrounding community and has touched many who go onto make a difference in South Florida. 

It was a sunny South Florida morning but inside the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for Miami-Dade County, in Doral, all everybody talked about was rain, devastating winds and storms.

A group of 40 sixth-graders from West Miami Middle School dashed between desks, coordinating emergency efforts during a simulation of what would happen during a category 4 hurricane.

The last thing senior paralegal Karen Leicht ever imagined was that she would serve three years in prison for a felony charge.

“It is a huge skeleton in the closet,” Leicht said after speaking on a panel organized by  the Greater Miami Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Miami branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and a group of public defenders at the Palmetto Bay public library on Sunday.

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