Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Florida Lieutenant Governor Jeanette Nunez is getting an office away from Tallahassee. Florida lawmakers are allowing Nunez to work remotely from South Florida. Nunez sees the move as a practical way to address the difficulty of travel to Tallahassee.

A housing crisis has emerged in the wake of Hurricane Michael. Now state and federal money is on the way to address it as local residents and leaders are growing anxious and frustrated. 

Former Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum says John Morgan should put his money where his mouth is. Morgan recently called out Gillum for keeping some $3 million in his campaign account -- money Morgan says Gillum should use to pay the restitution fees for former felons to help them regain their right to vote.

Governor Ron DeSantis has signed off two major pieces of education legislation this week. They include giving more teachers the option of carrying guns, and creating a new voucher program.

Tallahassee businessman J.T. Burnette has been indicted in an FBI probe into public corruption in the City of Tallahassee.

Former City Commissioner Scott Maddox and his former aide Paige Carter-Smith are already facing dozens of charges stemming from the inquiry. They’re accused of accepting bribes in exchange for votes and the FBI alleges Burnette was part of the scheme. 

President Donald Trump came to Panama City Beach Wednesday. In his campaign rally he promised $448 million in housing funds for the area, which continues struggling seven months after Hurricane Michael hit North Florida.

A key elections bill backed by the state’s supervisors heading for final votes. The measure is meant to address issues stemming from the 2018 election but Democrats say it doesn’t do enough.

President Donald Trump’s is planning a campaign visit to Panama City. The Panama City News Herald reports emails show the city recently signed off on the event.  It will be the President’s first time in the area following a tour of the damage after Hurricane Michael. 

Complaints about incarcerated women being denied basic hygiene products like pads and tampons has caught the attention of state lawmakers. Now Florida is poised to approve a bill making those products and others available to women at no cost.

The City of Tallahassee is set to close on its purchase of the old Northwood Mall around May 20th. That $7.1 million purchase also includes the land the Hooters restaurant sits on, as well as one of the locations for Enterprise car rentals and three restaurants.  The city is also considering 68 proposed sites for a new Tallahassee Police Department location.

Tourism is Florida’s largest industry yet the agency that markets the state could soon be going away. As lawmakers hammer out details of a roughly $90 billion  spending plan, Visit Florida could find itself left out.

An effort to let school districts choose whether to allow more classroom teachers to carry guns has cleared the Senate.

The broader bill incorporates recommendations from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Commission, which was tasked with examining the response and lead up to last year's Valentine’s Day School shooting in Parkland.

An effort to let school districts choose whether to allow more classroom teachers to carry guns, has cleared the Senate. The broader bill incorporates recommendations from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Commission, which was tasked with examining the response and lead up to last year's Valentine’s Day School shooting in Parkland. 

Florida lawmakers are responding to a report on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting in Parkland with a measure that addresses concerns raised in the 480-plus page report. Lawmakers say it’s "a good bill, but"—noting a divide over one portion that gives districts the option to allow classroom teachers to carry guns. The measure is now going before the full Senate amid controversy over the issue.

Florida’s tourism and marketing agency could be going away if the Florida House has its way. It comes as tourism remains the state’s dominant industry, and the state continues recovering from toxic algae blooms and hurricanes. 

Florida lawmakers hope to fill a teaching shortage by making it easier for people to become teachers. Rep. Ralph Massulo (R- Lecanto) notes in recent years school districts and administrators have raised concerns over the difficulty of finding, and keeping teachers in the classroom.

North Florida is facing an increased risk of wildfires after Hurricane Michael, and the first major one has broken out in Bay County.  The fire is 50 percent contained, but officials worry with all the downed trees on the ground, more frequent and severe wildfires could be on the way.

The irony, says Bay County Incident Commander Bryce Thomas, is that most of the debris on the ground will be gotten rid of through burning, "but it’s got to be burned correctly by professionals…people need to be so, so careful right now.” 

Florida lawmakers approved a series of new laws last year cracking down on telemarketers. Those laws went into effect last summer, and addressed everything from unwanted voicemails to allowing phone companies to pre-emptively block robocalls. And yet, the bad calls are still happening.

Florida lawmakers say they want to crack down on human trafficking—specifically sex trafficking. And the legislature is considering increasing penalties on those who solicit for prostitution. Bills on the move would tackle the issue simultaneously.

State lawmakers appear heading toward abolishing the state’s Constitution Revision Commission. This after the latest incarnation of the group was roundly criticized for being overtly political.  The effort has generated a rare point of bipartisanship between lawmakers and advocacy groups who don’t normally agree on anything.

It’s been months since Hurricane Michael struck the Panhandle, carving a swath of damage from the Gulf to the Georgia state line. Recovery is expected to take years, even a decade or more and schools are feeling the pressure. Bay County Superintendent Bill Husfelt recently spoke before the State Board of Education, outlining some of the problems that have cropped up in the wake of the storm.

All 12 seniors on Jefferson County’s football team have been signed to college scholarships. It comes amid the district’s second year as the state’s first and only charter school district, and on the heels of a consolidation of schools into one facility. 

Several controversial measures related to education are moving forward in Florida’s House and Senate.

Tallahassee is being rated as one of the South’s Best cities, according to the lifestyle magazine Southern Living. It’s the first time the city has gotten the nod.

A Florida A&M University institution has passed away. News of “Soul Train’s” death began circulating Monday on social media.

The Florida House and Senate are at odds over how to make good on Governor Ron DeSantis’s promise to eliminate a 13,000 student wait list for private school scholarships. 

Are Florida’s public universities promoting intellectual freedom? Some state lawmakers don’t think so, and they want to survey schools on the issue. It’s part of a broader bill aimed at tweaking the way the schools are run and funded.

The 2017 death of a Florida State University fraternity pledge is prompting lawmakers to consider a change in the state’s hazing law. Spearheading the effort are the parents of Andrew Coffey along with Democratic State Senator Lauren Book. 

Former Tallahassee City Manager Rick Fernandez will be fined $6,000 by the Florida Ethics Commission. That settles a two-year ethics case over Fernandez’s acceptance of Florida State University football tickets.

Hemp is gaining inroads in Florida following national decriminalization. Now Florida A&M University is trying to get ahead of the burgeoning market.

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