Nathaniel Sandler

Nathaniel Sandler is a contributing editor for the arts at WLRN. He is also the co-founder and Head Librarian of the Bookleggers Mobile Library, serving Miami with free books on a monthly basis at literary events throughout the city.

He is a graduate of Vassar College where he received a B.A. in Asian Studies. He spent two years living in Japan and teaching English. A lot of his current writing focuses on collections based object analysis, from South Florida museums, such a The Curious Vault at the Miami Science Museum, which is reposted on WLRN.

Currently, in addition to the Miami Science Museum, he writes for the University of Miami Special Collections Library, The Miami Rail, ArtSlant, Red Flag Magazine, Where Magazine many others. He owns a canoe and is terrible at softball.

In the last year, over $57 million in illegal assets relating to federal cases in South Florida have been seized by the United States government, according to data provided by the U.S. Attorney’s office in South Florida.

$57,321,390.40 to be exact.

Three South Florida mayors were accused of corruption in August, offering up a salient, cautionary tale for anyone who puts their faith in Miami's elected officials. The mayors from Sweetwater, Miami Lakes, and Homestead represent a triumvirate of questionable behavior, a triple threat of public office tomfoolery and a real world trifecta of tropical sleaze.

A new map clearly demarcates the racial divide in the United States through colorful dots, showing the demographics of South Florida and highlighting the striking partitions of how we live.

For example, most people know that Miami Beach is primarily a mix of white and Hispanic and that North Miami is mostly white east of Biscayne Boulevard and predominantly black on the west side. But there is more that can be read into the map.