Medicare

Wednesday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Oliver Formato, sales director for Humana Marketpoint, on the deadline for seniors to file for any changes in their Medicare coverage. We also spoke with artist Kedgar Volta and Denise Reagan of Brunet-Garcia about Volta’s display being unveiled during Art Walk bringing awareness of hunger on the First Coast. The Girl Scouts of Gateway Council CEO Mary Anne Jacobs told us about Sunday’s cookie selling kickoff with the Jacksonville Jaguars, and iHeartMedia Regional Event Director Candace Price joined us by phone to talk about Saturday’s inaugural Wine on the River event to benefit Hands on Jacksonville. 


shredded paper
Dave Bleasdale via Flickr

 

A mistake by Florida healthcare regulators may have exposed the personal information of thousands of Northeast Florida patients.

The Agency for Health Care Administration accidentally sent inspection records to a landfill, instead of a shredder, last month.

 


Healogics / LinkedIn

A Jacksonville-based company is being accused in a lawsuit of scheming to defraud Medicare.

The company, called Healogics, has been accused in a federal lawsuit of performing unnecessary treatments and then billing Medicare for them. The suit is being brought by two former employees under whistleblower laws.

This week marks 50 years since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid. The 2015 Medicare Made Clear Index polled older Americans to gauge perceptions of Medicare, its impact on seniors’ lives over the past 50 years and expectations for the program’s future. We discuss the survey's findings with Michael Lawton, CEO of UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Florida.

 


Colin Dunn / Flickr

The stalemate between the House and Senate over billions of dollars in health-care funding deepened Tuesday, as the federal government suggested that the fate of a pool of money for hospitals and other medical providers was tied to the state's decision on Medicaid expansion.

FL Blue, Humana on Feds' Audit List

Jun 11, 2014

Two of Florida's largest managed-care providers are among 30 on a list scheduled for landmark audits by federal health officials: Florida Blue, the state's largest overall insurer; and Humana, which has more Medicare enrollees than any other HMO in the state. 

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After years of criticism that they cost taxpayers too much, private Medicare Advantage health plans are facing audits that for the first time could order them to repay the government tens of millions of dollars for past overcharges and other billing mistakes.

ElderSource

They’re the premiere local agency helping older residents, disabled adults and their caregivers.

Office visits are the bread and butter of many physicians’ practices. Medicare pays for more than 200 million of them a year, often to deal with routine problems like colds or high blood pressure. Most require relatively modest amounts of a doctor’s time or medical know-how.

Monday was yet another troubled day for the Affordable Care Act.

Sunday night, the outside vendor that operates two key parts of the website that lets people browse and sign up for health insurance experienced a failure.

The failure took place at a vendor called Verizon Terremark and presumably affected other clients as well as HealthCare.gov, the federal website that people use to sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Wendy Shindler, a nurse, works in the waiting room of New York City's Montefiore Medical Center's emergency department, where she identifies patients waiting for services who don't actually need emergency room-level care. The program is an intervention aimed at improving care at the busy Bronx hospital while reducing costs.

Medicare is big. And as America gets grayer, the health insurance program for seniors and the disabled is going to get a lot bigger — and more expensive.

UF Health

The U.S. Department of Justice announced today that Shands Healthcare will pay $26 million to resolve allegations that its hospitals submitted false claims to Medicare, Medicaid and other federal health care programs.