Luis Hernandez

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

South Florida voters will need to do some homework before heading to the ballot box in the upcoming November general election. Some voters may have more than one page of items and races to vote on. That includes 12 amendment items to be considered for inclusion in the state constitution.

Some of those amendments are actually more than one item that had to be bundled together as to not have too many items on the ballot. A couple of those are being challenged in court.

On July 13, Walter Edward Stolper, a Nazi sympathizer, was caught in the act of pouring gasoline around his Miami Beach condo unit with the intent of igniting it. He was originally charged with attempted arson, but that was elevated to attempted murder. Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the case is likely to be considered a hate crime.

"[Stolper's] got two very powerful prosecution teams, the state and the feds looking at him," Oates said Wednesday on Sundial. "And again we avoided a tragedy because someone heard something and alerted law enforcement." 

Students in South Florida could soon have an app to help them with their mental health. Teacher Samantha Pratt came up with the idea as a way for students to find help dealing with personal or school stressors. The app, called Klickengage, would also let teachers know the mental states of their students before the school day gets underway.

Fort Lauderdale made national headlines last year when bulldozers cleared out a homeless encampment in Stranahan Park. Before that the city had become part of late night talk show fodder after authorities arrested then 90-year-old Arnold Abbott for feeding the homeless in areas not designated for that activity.

The #MeToo movement has reached into all sorts of industries. Now, add comedy. There's an all-woman comedy show coming to the Center Stage Performing Arts in Boca Raton this Friday, May 18. The lead organizer, Kim Huapaya, put the event together after one of her colleagues alleges she was sexually assaulted twice. Half of the evening's proceeds will go to the nonprofit Dress For Success.

Sometimes Leonard Pitts Jr., the nationally syndicated Miami Herald columnist, wants to change your mind. Sometimes he just wants to scream about the things that bother him. He says that may be the case when he's writing about President Trump. Currently, he's in a Twitter spat with Senator Marco Rubio.

There's a disturbing reality about college life today. Roughly one in four students, predominantly women, will become victims of some form of sexual assault, according to a new survey.

The regular football season for the Miami Dolphins kicks off in Washington this Sunday. The team's first home game is against the Buffalo Bills Sept. 27, and on that day fans will notice some changes -- especially to the food.

Last week, the team's hospitality provider, Centerplate, announced changes to the menu. Ben Metzger is the concessions and retail manager. He says it was all about creating a local flavor for the fans. 

Julian Castro, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, is in South Florida this week for the National Urban League Conference.

Castro spoke with WLRN about the latest decision by HUD to put pressure on cities that receive federal dollars to do more to provide fair housing. Below is an edited version of our conversation.