Luis Hernandez

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

If you love movie posters -- the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is taking a trip back in time to Hollywood’s Golden Era.

Betsy Willeford lives in a home surrounded by books. Her prized item is a photograph of her late husband, Charles Willeford. He's sitting on a curbside, glasses in hand, as he stares directly at you. What is he thinking at the moment the camera snapped? 

The Sundial Book Club is currently reading "Dancing in the Baron's Shadow," by Haitian American author Fabienne Josaphat, which takes place in Haiti during the dictatorship of Francios Duvalier, also known as Papa Doc. 

College graduation is here. And you've probably been seeing a lot of photos of recent graduates from the class of 2019 with their caps, gowns and smiles. But what happens to South Florida graduates after they receive their diploma?

Some will continue their education into graduate school. Others are heading into the job market. Some will be staying in South Florida to build their lives and careers. And others will leave to try and find their dreams in another place. And many will be leaving with student loan debt.

The Sundial Book Club is reading Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" this March. The book, which is a favorite for high school students across the country, takes place in the real Central Florida town of Eatonville and follows a middle-aged black woman named Janie Crawford. 

Eatonville is a special place for writers who make annual pilgrimages to honor Hurston and her contribution to American literature. There's an annual festival and a museum dedicated to Eatonville's favorite daughter. 

Mark Richt announced his retirement as the head coach for the University of Miami football program last December and the school didn't waste time looking for his replacement. There was only one name that mattered and he had just taken a job as the head coach at Temple.

From toothbrushes, to water bottles, to straws, plastics are a part of everyday life. And yet the damage they cause to oceans and wildlife is well established. 

Long overlooked in the history of Key West is the influence of the Jewish community on the island city. From cigar factories in the 1880s to smuggling and immigration, Arlo Haskell's book “The Jews of Key West: Smugglers, Cigar Makers, and Revolutionaries” goes back almost 200 years to tell the forgotten story.

Forty-three students and teachers who survived the Parkland massacre on Feb. 14, 2018 have published a compilation of writing, photography and art.

It's true. I gave up the NFL for one whole season. At first, I must admit it was hard. It was extraordinarily hard. Those first Sundays, I would turn on the game almost by reflex. Then I would turn it off and forced myself out of the apartment to find a distraction. But, as time passed, I learned to fill my weekends with other activities and personal pursuits. Like what? Well, the obvious. I read more. But, that's not all. I finished the first draft of my novel. I listened to a lot of podcasts and even started working on one of my own. So yeah, it got a lot easier to let go of the game.

Miami prosecutors said they will not file any charges in a cockfighting investigation citing "serious ethical concerns" about the tactics used by the animal rights group that went undercover to find the ring.

Key West is a popular locale for writers to set their stories. Beyond the aquamarine waters and swaying palm trees, the Keys provide openness, tolerance and isolation.

Those are among the reasons why author Silas House decided to set his novel in the southernmost city in the United States. The November title for the Sundial Book Club, "Southernmost" is the story of Asher Sharp, a former preacher in a small Tennessee town who kidnaps his own son after losing a custody battle. Of course, they end up in Key West.

Name three of the most infamous villains of literature or pop culture in the last century and it's likely that you'll mention, or at least think about, Dracula.

The 19th-century character, though not as popular in its early years, has spawned a love-affair with the dark and mysterious creatures, vampires. They are, today, widely celebrated in books, television shows and movies more than 100 years after Bram Stoker brought the character to life in the pages of his novel.

South Florida voters will need to do some homework before heading to the ballot box in the upcoming November general election. Some voters may have more than one page of items and races to vote on. That includes 12 amendment items to be considered for inclusion in the state constitution.

Some of those amendments are actually more than one item that had to be bundled together as to not have too many items on the ballot. A couple of those are being challenged in court.

On July 13, Walter Edward Stolper, a Nazi sympathizer, was caught in the act of pouring gasoline around his Miami Beach condo unit with the intent of igniting it. He was originally charged with attempted arson, but that was elevated to attempted murder. Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the case is likely to be considered a hate crime.

"[Stolper's] got two very powerful prosecution teams, the state and the feds looking at him," Oates said Wednesday on Sundial. "And again we avoided a tragedy because someone heard something and alerted law enforcement." 

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