Nadege Green

Nadege Green loves only-in-Miami stories. After five years as a Miami Herald reporter, she is convinced Miami is the best news town ever. Really, you can’t make up some of the stuff that happens here.

Nadege has covered local city governments and as a sub-beat, Miami’s Haitian community.

She is a graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Former Palm Beach Gardens Officer Nouman Raja tried to use Florida's "stand your ground" law to have manslaughter and attempted murder charges against him dismissed. Raja shot and killed  Corey Jones, 31, whose car was stranded on the side of the road.

On Friday, Circuit Judge Samantha Schosberg Feuer denied the motion to dismiss.

A Spanish language play in Miami that's been showing since January until recently featured a character in blackface.

The promotional video for "Tres Viudas en un Crucero" (Three Widows on a Cuise) shows a fair-skinned actress smeared in brown makeup and overdrawn big red lips pounding her chest and joking about having fun like three gorillas.

Florida was the first state to enact a "stand your ground" law. Under the law, a person is allowed to use lethal force — and has no duty to retreat — if they believe they are in danger.

Since it was enacted in 2005, the law has drawn high-profile controversies, including the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

Harvard professor Caroline Light was recently in Miami to talk about the law’s historical roots and her book “Stand Your Ground: A History of America's Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense.”

Rollin Virgile walks through his Little Haiti store amid dozens of weddings dresses, white floral crowns, men’s tuxedo vests and baptism gowns. He greets customers in Creole: "Bonswa, koman nou ye?" (Good afternoon, how are you all?) 

The Dade County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section held an essay contest for students to discuss their experiences with gun violence and to offer up possible solutions.

Students from across Miami-Dade wrote about hearing gun shots outside of their homes, the lack of resources for neighborhoods plagued by gun violence and the need for more counselors to address youth trauma.

Immediately after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting, counselors and therapists were available in local parks.  But since that public showing of mental health support, students and their families continue to struggle with the trauma of what happened.

A group of teenagers formed a circle in the middle of a former school library turned community meeting space in Liberty City on a recent Saturday afternoon.

Aliyah Blackmon, a junior at Miami Norland,  is standing in the middle reading from a sheet of paper. 

“Step up if you haven’t been sleeping due to the recent gun violence in our neighborhood,” she said.

A few teens step up.

“Step up if you feel numb or over it. “

Nearly all of the teens stepped forward.

President Donald Trump visited South Florida Monday and heard Cuban-American business owners heap praise on him for his $1.5 trillion tax cut package.

Survivors of gun violence from across Miami-Dade gathered at the Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park  Saturday to share their experiences.

Hundreds of Miami Northwestern students walked out of class on Tuesday — a day after an on-campus tribute was held in memory of 17-year-old Kimson Green, who was shot and killed at a Liberty Square Housing Project on Sunday.

The students at Miami Northwestern High School  left their morning classes for an outdoor tribute in memory of Kimson Green, a sophomore at the school who was killed in the Liberty Square Housing project Sunday.

At Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School’s Black History Month Show, a student walked out on stage to read a one-page statement defending the Black Lives Matter movement.

This part of the show was not rehearsed ahead of time, it was a last-minute decision by some of the black student organizers to respond to a letter that ran in the school’s paper. 

A group of students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High has started a new Twitter account to uplift the narratives of survivors at the school and other gun violence survivors.

Lorena Sanabria, 16, is one of the students managing the Twitter account @StoriesUntoldUS. She said the idea was  created after listening to classmates at Stoneman Douglas who were in the freshman building where the massacre occurred and hearing them recount that day weeks later.

It started with a handful of students in Parkland that spoke up after a shooter gunned down 17 of their peers and faculty at their school. Then hundreds joined their cause. They wanted gun control. Now.

Less than a month later, the same group of student activists organized a national walk out to protest gun violence and demand gun reform. 

Then, on March 24, students led marches for their lives, in Parkland, in Washington, D.C. and across the world.

What happens next?

For one thing, they aren't slowing down.

"The Unvoiced Community: Barbecue Men and Women of Goulds" is a photo exhibit that explores barbecue culture in the streets of South Miami-Dade County. The exhibit celebrates local entrepreneurs who set up in parking lots and street corners selling smoked meats late into the evening hours.

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