Daniel Rivero

Daniel Rivero is a reporter and producer for WLRN, covering Latino and criminal justice issues. Before joining the team, he was an investigative reporter and producer on the television series "The Naked Truth," and a digital reporter for Fusion.

His work has won honors of the Murrow Awards, Sunshine State Awards and Green Eyeshade Awards. He has also been nominated for a Livingston Award and a GLAAD Award on reporting on the background of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's tenure as Attorney General of Oklahoma and on the Orlando nightclub shooting, respectively.

Daniel was born on the outskirts of Washington D.C. to Cuban parents, and moved to Miami full time twenty years ago. He learned to walk with a wiffle ball bat and has been a skateboarder since the age of ten.

With its passage on November 6, Amendment 4 granted over a million felons across the state the right to vote.

In remarks made in Doral on Monday, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and a retiring commander of U.S. military operations in the Caribbean and much of Latin America offered starkly different readings of the state of security in the Western Hemisphere.

The comments came during a change of command ceremony for the U.S. Southern Command, or SOUTHCOM, the branch of the Pentagon that oversees operations in the Caribbean as well as Central and South America.

The city of Miami is close to passing a first-of-its-kind ordinance that will require developers to include affordable housing units in new buildings for a section of the city that is currently undergoing a boom.

The policy was passed unanimously by the City Commission during a first hearing earlier this month. There will be a second hearing on Dec. 13, when it appears likely to become law.

The telenovela that is the Palm Beach County recount continued to unfold Thursday inside the Supervisor of Elections Office. Overheated and old machines, a lack of sleep for workers and last-minute vote discrepancies were to blame.

When asked by reporters about the looming deadline for the state recount, Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher told reporters that the “likelihood is slim” that the county will finish by 3 p.m. 

Over 10,000 so-called "over-under" ballots have been identified by the Miami-Dade Elections Department in the course of a recount for three state races ordered by the state of Florida, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez said on Tuesday.

"Over-under" ballots are those where someone either filled in two or more blanks, or left the question blank entirely. If a manual recount is ordered by the state after the machine recount that is currently under way, those ballots will be reviewed and possibly tabulated.

It was noon on Monday and Miami-Dade County was about halfway done with its ballot recount for last week’s elections. Yet next door, in Broward County, the official recount hadn’t even started yet.

On Tuesday, Florida voters passed Amendment 4 with over 64 percent of the vote. The passage of the citizen- driven initiative will grant the right to vote to over a million Florida citizens that have been convicted of felonies at some point in their lifetimes.

If you voted provisionally on Election Day, you have until 5 p.m. today to prove you were eligible to vote and have your vote counted.

Provisional votes can be somewhat described as "purgatory votes" -- votes cast by people who were not immediately able to prove their eligibility to vote. Until the voter submits proof that they are eligible to vote where they did, the votes do not count.

On paper, it should have never been this close. But Republican Maria Elvira Salazar made a sure-win seat for Democrats as competitive as any analyst could have imagined, before losing the 27th Congressional District of Florida seat to Democrat Donna Shalala.

Last year, Brazilian president-elect Jair Bolsonaro told a crowd of Brazilians gathered in Deerfield Beach, Fla. that he would “give police carte blanche to kill.” The first-time pronouncement was met with cheers and made headlines back in Brazil.

One of the statewide amendments voters will be facing in November includes four different questions. It would mandate a state department of veteran affairs, and a state anti-terrorism office. It would also change the calendar of state legislative sessions. And lastly, it would make fundamental changes to the way counties are run. It’s that last question that has county leaders in Miami-Dade, Broward and Volusia up in arms.

The suspect arrested Friday morning by federal authorities in connection with several pipe bombs delivered across the country to prominent critics of President Trump has been identified as Cesar Altieri Sayoc.

As voters across Florida gear up for early voting for the November elections, and as some ballots have already been shipped out to overseas voters, one question is being repeated over dinner tables and text message chains: “How should I vote on this amendment that is asking me three different questions at the same time?”

Mail ballots are convenient but lack certain perks that voting in person gives voters. Namely, mail-in ballots are ten times more likely to be thrown out by county Supervisors of Elections than in-person ballots, according to a report issued last month by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida.

In a courtroom on Tuesday morning, Andre Gonzales was granted another chance at life.

After serving more than twelve years for a murder outside of a nightclub in Liberty City, prosecutors dismissed all charges against Gonzales. The outcome was the culmination of an effort by the Medill Justice Project, a student journalism project based out of Northwestern University in Chicago.

A federal appeals court has blocked a last ditch attempt to free Lolita, the orca housed at the Miami Seaquarium, in a case brought by the non-profit advocacy group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA.

A crowd of people gathered at Little Havana’s Ball & Chain nightclub on Friday, sweating under the gaze of a stage that looks like a giant hollowed out pineapple, as drafts of mojito mint freshened the night air. The event was in support of Andrew Gillum, the Democratic nominee for Governor of Florida. But for many speakers and attendees, the event’s location was also important in terms of counter-messaging.

A recent series of stories by the Miami New Times found that police in Miami-Dade County have made tens of thousands of arrests for small amounts of marijuana, even after a 2015 policy allowed them to issue civil citations for those same offenses.

Those optional arrests have at times led to life-changing consequences for the suspects.

A group of elections transparency and fairness activists gathered in Hollywood Monday to discuss voter suppression, felony disenfranchisement and election security. But speaker after speaker asked a single question: What has gone wrong with the elections process in Broward County?

When Chris Riley created the phone app TIKD from his Coral Gables offices, he had dreams of innovating access to the court system for people who got speeding tickets. What he never imagined was that he would soon butt heads with the Florida Bar, that he would be claiming nearly $20 million in damages from the entity that regulates attorneys in the state and that the federal government would get behind him in his fight.

Every 20 years the Florida Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) meets to propose changes of law to the Florida Constitution. In 2018 the commission met and came up with several ideas included in the 13 amendment proposals to send to Florida voters in the November 2018 elections.

Whether voters will actually ever see those amendments at the ballot box is another story.

The Miami-Dade County Police Department has created a new unit tasked with preventing people with serious mental illnesses from reaching a crisis point or potentially shooting someone with firearms, WLRN has learned.

Former television journalist Maria Elvira Salazar cruised into a victory for the Republican Party primary for the 27th Congressional District of Florida, winning 45.51 percent of the votes in a crowded race that had nine candidates.

Salazar stepped into the victory party to blaring salsa in the heavily Cuban-American Westchester neighborhood, holding the hand of soon-to-be-retiring Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who has held the seat for decades. 

A controversial city of Fort Lauderdale ordinance banning the sharing of food with homeless residents in a city park was dealt a blow by a federal appeals court Wednesday. The decision declared food sharing as protected by the First Amendment, and sent the case back to a lower court to decide whether the city violated the right to free speech.

The lower court had previously sided with the city.

Florida prisons are seeing an increasing number of inmate deaths that authorities blame on a synthetic marijuana substance known as K2, or spice.

The increase in overdoses has prompted state officials to launch an educational campaign intended to show inmates the dangers of using the substance. The campaign was first reported by WLRN's news partner the Miami Herald.

Boca Raton-based private prison company GEO Group has issued a cease-and-desist letter to the Miami-based activist group Dream Defenders, sparking a sharply worded response from the activist group. 

Is Jeff Greene, the billionaire Democratic candidate for Florida governor, a member of President Donald Trump’s Mar-A-Lago resort in West Palm Beach?

It’s a question that is starting to haunt the candidate in his push to get the Democratic nomination in the August 28 primary.

Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery in Miami's Brownsville neighborhood is so old that the cultural practices of the people buried here were different than what we know today. Unlike almost all the final places of rest in South Florida, the graves were built above ground; the Everglades hadn’t been drained yet and the water table was too high for burials.

At an open air warehouse in Hialeah Gardens that is usually used for airsoft battle scenarios, a class of students is learning how not to die overseas. For the last three days they have played out terrorist and hostage scenarios, learned how to help themselves or others with first-aid kits, and got tips on how to navigate through potentially hostile territories.

Over the last decade, the city of Miami has removed the vast majority of individual street parking meters and half of its multispace meters, according to the Miami Parking Authority. This has led to vast sections of the city that have no available methods of paying for parking other than using PayByPhone, a privately owned company that is owned by Volkswagen, the largest car manufacturer in the world.

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