Daniel Rivero

Daniel Rivero is a reporter and producer for WLRN, covering Latino and criminal justice issues. Before joining the team, he was an investigative reporter and producer on the television series "The Naked Truth," and a digital reporter for Fusion.

His work has won honors of the Murrow Awards, Sunshine State Awards and Green Eyeshade Awards. He has also been nominated for a Livingston Award and a GLAAD Award on reporting on the background of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's tenure as Attorney General of Oklahoma and on the Orlando nightclub shooting, respectively.

Daniel was born on the outskirts of Washington D.C. to Cuban parents, and moved to Miami full time twenty years ago. He learned to walk with a wiffle ball bat and has been a skateboarder since the age of ten.

Say you want to cut down a tree on your own property -- or even just trim it. That might sound simple enough but in some places residents need to get permission from the local government first. Not having the right paperwork can have costly consequences, as this Little Havana family can attest to. 

On Monday, a major hearing is set to take place in Tallahassee that will set the tone of a challenge to a Florida law that opponents have called a “poll tax.”

Teachers in Miami-Dade County gathered this weekend at Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden to get new materials that could one day help take humans deeper into space. And if all goes well, it could provide a meal for the classroom.

Newly filed court records are shedding light on the closely watched federal court case relating to voting rights for people with felony convictions. Several groups filed lawsuits against state and local officials after Governor Ron DeSantis signed a law tying the right to vote to paying all the fines and fees related to a felony conviction.

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA - After days of living on a devastated island with no electricity or running water, thousands gathered at Freeport Harbour in Grand Bahama this weekend trying to get tickets to the first passenger boat leaving from Freeport to the Port of Palm Beach since Hurricane Dorian struck.

A grand jury convened by the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office has sounded a dire warning about the state of Biscayne Bay, which it calls the “crown jewel of our environment.” The group warned local officials that immediate action should be taken to save it, and included a variety of recommendations.

The Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office -- the largest prosecutor’s office in the state of Florida -- is moving forward with a plan that would soften the financial blow of state law SB 7066 that ties the restoration of voting rights to someone’s ability to pay fines, fees and restitution for a felony offense.

The first legal challenge to Florida’s controversial law banning so-called “sanctuary” cities and counties was filed on Tuesday against Governor Ron DeSantis and Attorney General Ashley Moody in the Southern District of Florida. Leading the federal lawsuit is the City of South Miami.

 

"Ni las moscas están [Not even the fleas are here]." That's how one shopkeeper at the Tropicana Flea Market in Miami's Allapattah neighborhood described the usually bustling place on Sunday. 

A new Florida law requiring local governments to comply with federal immigration enforcement went into effect Monday. One of the requirements of SB 168 is that every county in the state has to reach a formal agreement with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in order to be in compliance. 

A federal lawsuit has been filed against the Florida Secretary of State and ten county Supervisors of Elections across the peninsula, in what amounts to the first major legal challenge to a controversial bill that was passed by the Republican-dominated legislature to require former felons pay all fines and fees before being able to vote.

This report will be updated through the evening.

8:20 p.m.

Round two of the Democratic debates kicks off Thursday evening, but not before one candidate caused outrage by quoting  Argentine revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara in Miami.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, who participated in Wednesday's debate, made the gaffe during a union protest at Miami International Airport. As he backed workers' efforts to unionize, de Blasio told them the eyes of the world were watching, then repeated Guevara's rallying cry: "Hasta la victoria, siempre."

The number of Cuban nationals being detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has sharply risen over the last few years, according official data from the federal agency obtained by WLRN through a Freedom of Information Act request.

As an illustrator and publisher, Conrado Wilson Massaguer helped sear the image of Cuba as a tropical paradise into the minds of American tourists in the first half of the 20th century, until the Cuban Revolution. It's an image that lives on in reprints of his works that line the walls of countless Cuban-American family homes.

Take for instance, the timeless image of a Cuban woman dressed in puffy white clothes, eyes closed, head back, shaking her maracas. “Visit Cuba,” the tourism advertisement reads. “So Near, and Yet So Foreign.”

The state of Florida has officially launched an investigation into the group that raised over $23 million online, in a stated effort to privately build President Trump’s proposed border wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

“In response to consumer complaints, including those referred by the Office of the Attorney General, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has opened an investigation into this charity,” Department of Agriculture spokesperson Franco Ripple told WLRN in an email.

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