Jenny Staletovich

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Miami-Dade County’s morgue sits on a gritty corner opposite the Ryder Trauma Center, in the shadow of a boxy parking garage.

It’s not an unsurprising setting for cataloguing the worst of South Florida. What’s unexpected is inside: a skylight bathes the lobby in sunshine and makes the green carpet look like a forest floor. Loveseats and chairs are arranged for hushed conversations and hugs. A painting of a heron perched in a cypress swamp hangs on a wall outside the records room.

A crack in a half-century old iron sewer pipe has grown and could keep leaking for up to three weeks while workers struggle to fix it, Miami-Dade County Water and Sewer Director Kevin Lynskey said Friday.

Four thousand years ago, rising seas decimated huge swaths of mangroves in Florida Bay.

Today, seas rising at a far greater rate, combined with increasing storms and drought, could lead to another catastrophic loss of mangroves that help keep the state from sliding into the sea, according to a new study published by the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal Nature Communications.

As the planet heats up, polar ice melts, seas rise and Biblical-size rains become more frequent, hurricanes are expected to get wetter and more intense.

But less certain is how much climate change is making these fierce storms, which target Florida more than any other U.S. state, more punishing now.

The sparkling waters of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary help pump $4.4 billion into the state's economy while supporting 43,000 jobs, according to a report published Tuesday.

The Florida Everglades can be a contentious place. Politicians, conservationists and farmers never seem to agree on much.

Debate among scientists tends to be collegial. But a new study on coral and the Florida Keys that gained national headlines last week has reignited a decades-old dispute over pollution and the Everglades.

 

In a gravel parking lot on Virginia Key crowded with shade tanks used for raising fish, coral researchers have a new project underway: a Noah's Ark for disappearing coral.

Climate change is making the planet warmer, but a new report says there's something worse on the horizon: extreme heat.

Extending the 836/Dolphin Expressway over protected wetlands in Miami-Dade County is drawing new scrutiny from South Florida water managers.

A new high tide forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calls for ongoing sea rise to nearly double the number of days with sunny day flooding over just two decades ago.

The forecast, issued Wednesday for the entire U.S. coast, concludes that flooding from tides is likely to change from a sporadic problem to a chronic one.

This report will be updated through the evening.

8:20 p.m.

Round two of the Democratic debates kicks off Thursday evening, but not before one candidate caused outrage by quoting  Argentine revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara in Miami.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, who participated in Wednesday's debate, made the gaffe during a union protest at Miami International Airport. As he backed workers' efforts to unionize, de Blasio told them the eyes of the world were watching, then repeated Guevara's rallying cry: "Hasta la victoria, siempre."

A former lead biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who managed the controversial dredging of PortMiami will plead guilty to lying, her attorney told a Miami federal judge on Tuesday.

A pair of Miami architects who infuriated neighbors and drew the scrutiny of county environmental regulators when they chopped down mangroves at their waterfront property in the wake of Hurricane Irma have sold the lot for more than double what they paid.

Replacing and refurbishing old coastal pumps to brace for sea level rise could cost South Florida tens of millions of dollars per year over the next decade.

In a report to South Florida Water Management District governing board members on Thursday, district hydrology chief Aki Owosina said a review of the 16-county agency found that 26 of the 36 coastal pumps would likely fail to do their job or be in danger of not working. The most vulnerable were in Miami-Dade, Broward and Collier counties.

A summertime Gulf of Mexico dead zone fueled by pollution flowing out of the Mississippi River watershed could be among the largest on record this year.

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