Katherine Lepri

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One week ago, President Trump said in a tweet that four Democratic freshman Congresswomen "go back" and "help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." All of the representatives are U.S. citizens. Three were born here. 

Democrats widely criticized the tweets. Republicans mostly stayed silent. Trump denied the comments were racist.

"Ni las moscas están [Not even the fleas are here]." That's how one shopkeeper at the Tropicana Flea Market in Miami's Allapattah neighborhood described the usually bustling place on Sunday. 

Tuesday is the last day of April and that means the end of National Poetry Month. 

Here in South Florida we’ve been marking this month with your five-lined 'Zip Odes.' These are poems in which the number of words per line is determined by the digits in your zip code.

For example, if you live in Boca Raton and your zip code is 33433, a corresponding Zip Ode would have five lines: three words, three words, four words, three words and three words. 

Over the past five weeks, we received more than 2,300 Zip Odes. 

At WLRN, our reporters are not just fans of public radio. We also love public libraries. 

For one of our reporters, the library was where animals came alive on pages and giants climbed up tree stalks, where it was easy to get tangled up in a jungle and find herself in a city in another country without ever moving an inch. For others, it was where they found hidden treasures, both in people and in history. For another, the library is a refuge, another place to call home. 

Your first library card. Finding your favorite book in the young adult section. The free museum passes. 

Whatever the reason, WLRN would like to hear why you go to the library and about one of the best moments you've ever had at a public library.

For Miami-Dade County library assistant Juan Espinosa, it was during the 90s. He was going through a rough time. 

In honor of Women's History Month, WLRN is collecting stories about inspiring women in South Florida. We appreciate your tweets, emails and texts about the amazing women in your communities. 

Florence Morgenstern has always loved music — classical and soul, contemporary and folk.

Nearly 17 years ago, she had an idea: to create a concert series that would bring more of the music she loved to her South Florida community. In one performance, there could be four tenors; in another, a pop trio singing Broadway tunes.

At Bayfront Park in the City of Miami, a 10-foot tall bronze statue stands in honor of Julia Tuttle. She holds oranges in one hand and branches with tiny flowers in the other. 

Tuttle has long been recognized as the “Mother of Miami” — the only woman to found a major city in the United States. The original story, as told by local South Florida historians for decades, says it was her and her alone that founded the City of Miami.

From massive shortages of food and medicine to an interim president and possible U.S. intervention, the situation in Venezuela has been complex and fast moving in recent months.

We asked readers and listeners to share their questions about what's going on in Venezuela to let us help you make sense of it all.  

Here are some of the frequently asked questions, answered by WLRN's Latin American correspondent Tim Padgett. 

Q: Why does it matter to America what happens in Venezuela?

Jessica Levenson remembers the armed guards with bullet proof vests and rifles on campus after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. 

"It made me feel unnerved," she said. 

She said it made Nova High, in Davie, feel more like prison than high school. 

Despite appreciating the extra security, which the Florida Legislature implemented to make school campuses feel safer, she felt less secure.  

Imagine stepping back in time just by stepping into a hotel room.

Through one door, it's 1957 again. A young couple arrives in Miami for the first time.

In another room, it's the mid 90s. A recovering alcoholic has found God and is struggling to stay sober.

In a third, you enter 1964. A Playboy Bunny takes a break from work with a man she's met at the club. 

Who says vegetarians can't also have full bellies this Thanksgiving? 

Hundreds of people gathered at the Miami Beach Holocaust Memorial Tuesday evening to remember the lives of the 11 worshipers massacred at a Jewish synagogue in Pittsburgh over the weekend.

Election Day is just four weeks away and the deadline to register to vote is Tuesday, October 9. Early voting kicks off in two weeks. 

WLRN asked for your questions regarding the upcoming Nov. 6 midterm election.

We posed some of them to the top three election supervisors in South Florida — Miami-Dade Elections Supervisor Christina White, Broward Elections Supervisor Brenda Snipes and Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher.

Here are some of your questions, answered: 

How do we update our signatures?

Updated 9:18 a.m.

Beaches in Palm Beach and Miami-Dade counties are open again after being shut down due to a red tide outbreak, according to county authorities.  

A 42-year-old woman's neighborhood was devastated because of Irma’s storm surge. Some of her neighbors never returned. 

A 66-year-old woman in Key West is still waiting for her roof to be replaced.

A 43-year old mom's roof leaks and she wants to move out, but she can't afford to. 

A 59-year-old man's home emerged relatively unscathed amidst severe devastation and loss on Big Pine Key.

These four South Florida residents live with daily reminders of Hurricane Irma. 

Approximately one out of every four eligible voters in Florida cast a ballot in the state's primary elections last month. 

Voter turnout was up, but not by much. Eighteen percent of voters cast a ballot four years ago, in the 2014 primary midterms, compared to the roughly 25 percent who did in the primaries this year. 

Iguana removal experts say this year be might record-setting in the number of invasive reptiles that are creeping around South Florida.

There's no way to get a firm estimate of the exact number of invasive iguanas in the state. They haven't been counted because state resources have been put in other areas, like the fight to eradicate burmese python out of the Everglades, said Joe Wasilewski, a conservation biologist and president of environmental consulting firm Natural Selections of South Florida. 

The first few matches of this year’s FIFA World Cup have been seismic.

Mexico literally shook the ground after beating Germany –a highlight for some fans like Susan Dirgins-Friend, who's from California and lives in Davie.

"Though I am not Latin, Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans are close to my heart," she says.

School's out for the summer.

For thousands of students and their families, the end of the school year means graduation. 

We asked listeners what they would tell graduating students if given the chance to give a commencement speech.


It's the the last day of Florida’s week-long sales tax "holiday" on hurricane supplies. So, you may want to hurry up and by that generator, hand crank radio or gas tank--a bit cheaper than usual. 

Teachers nationwide are protesting their paychecks. Educators in Arizona voted to walk out, joining similar efforts in Oklahoma, West Virginia and Kentucky.

 

Teachers are speaking up at the same time that students around the country are mobilizing against gun violence. Thousands of public school students across the country planned to walk out on Friday in remembrance of the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting that killed 13 people in 1999.

When the clock changes every November, Stan Kaymin has to wear a headlamp to deliver mail in the late afternoon. 

If Florida didn’t change its clocks twice a year, he’d be happier: no more headgear. 

In the most rural parts of his South Dade delivery route, it's just his headlamp and the lights from his truck while he delivers mail. 

Last week, several cities announced they were suing Gov. Rick Scott to overturn a 1987 state law that bans cities from passing tougher restrictions than the state on guns..

Imagine a new middle school planned in Brickell that has apartments for teachers on one of its floors. 

That's the latest idea Miami-Dade County Public School is proposing to help it's employees find affordable housing in a market where the the cost of rent is constantly growing.

The school district is considering using its own properties on or near school campuses to build housing for teachers. Also being considered: a 300 unit apartment complex next to Phyllis Wheatley Elementary in Overtown.

It’s been about six months since Hurricane Irma crashed across the Florida Keys as a Category 4 storm.

WLRN News is documenting where we were — and how far we’ve come.

Here’s how you can be part of this project: Find a photo you took right after the storm, then take a photo of the same place now. The photos can be taken with your cell phone or a professional camera.