Madeline Fox

Madeline Fox is a reporter for the Kansas News Service covering foster care, mental health and military and veterans’ issues.

Madeline caught the bug for Kansas reporting as a college intern at the Wichita Eagle. She also worked at WLRN in South Florida, where she covered everything from parades to protests to presidential residences and got swiftly addicted to Cuban coffee.

She cut her teeth as a political reporter covering transportation for the Medill News Service in Washington, D.C. Her work has appeared in U.S. News, Military Times, The Miami Herald, NPR Weekend Edition and others.

A native of Portland, Oregon but a Chicagoan at heart, Madeline graduated from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism with a second major in international studies that she mostly used as an excuse to study abroad in Spain and conduct research in the Paris suburbs.

The shoreline surrounding the iconic Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse is falling away at an accelerated rate.

Over the holiday season, vandalism and unauthorized use of the dunes along the shoreline put the lighthouse area on track for erosion to go up even more than its already stepped-up pace of seven feet per year over the last ten years, up from its historical average of two feet per year.

Toxic blooms of red tide are the scourge of Southwest Florida’s sea turtles, who often find themselves stranded onshore or killed after ingesting too many of their deadly brevitoxins.

But researchers and wildlife veterinarians around the state are finding that what treats toxicity in humans – namely, a treatment used for drug overdoses – also works on the four-legged flippers.

Fears of widespread immigration raids in South Florida appeared to dissipate without major actions on Sunday - but left migrant communities and advocates with renewed reason to come up with different strategies to deal with deportation of themselves or close family members.

In West Kendall, longtime immigrant rights advocate Nora Sandigo was praying she wouldn’t get a call on Sunday from any of her more than 1,500 children.

“Today we haven’t seen anything major,” she said in Spanish. “We hope it stays like this for the next few days.”

Confirmation hearings begin this week for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

One issue state lawmakers may find most significant is reproductive rights and how Kavanaugh responds to questions regarding Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that gave women the constitutional right to choose abortion.

Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins says Kavanaugh told her that he views the landmark abortion rights ruling as "settled law."