Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is a reporter at WUSF, as part of the Health News Florida team. Her assignment: distill policy and science so it makes sense on a personal level.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Mary has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636 on Twitter @MaryShedden or by email

Hurricane Dorian struck the northern Bahamas as a catastrophic Category 5 storm Sunday, its record 185 mph winds ripping off roofs, overturning cars and tearing down power lines as hundreds hunkered down in schools, churches and shelters.

CBD is showing up more and more in Florida, from gas stations to grocery stories. It was being sold long before it became legal in the state on July 1. But there is a lot of confusion about whether it’s safe and what is legitimate.

Journalists from WUSF Public Media received three honors Saturday night at the annual Sunshine State Awards hosted by the Florida chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Florida’s budget was made official Friday afternoon, but not before Gov. Ron DeSantis issued vetoes for 25 projects and programs specifically for the Tampa Bay region.

This week on Florida Matters, we talk about zoning and how it affects the way our state manages growth.

It may sound mundane, but zoning and building regulations affect us intimately because they hit us where we live.


Daylina Miller, a multimedia reporter for WUSF Public Media and its Health News Florida project, was named the winner of a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in writing.

WUSF Public Media journalists won 11 honors Saturday night in the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Contest, including five first-place finishes and a second-place award for Station of the Year.

WUSF News will be highlighting America's affordable housing crunch and its impact here at home in an upcoming special report.

Several Tampa Bay area elections offices are extending their hours to help voters with contested mail-in ballots.

Follow along as NPR updates election results from the Tampa Bay area and other key Florida races.

The political stakes in Florida couldn’t get much higher.

On Tuesday, voters will pick a new governor and a U.S. Senator. Congressional and state legislative seats are up for grabs, as well as Attorney General and a slew of local offices. There’s also a long list of constitutional amendments -- on everything from gambling and voting rights to homestead taxes and vaping.

It’s been a year since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico. Recovery continues on the devastated island, but transitions are also happening here in Florida, where many residents evacuated and some have chosen to stay.

NPR recently received a firestorm of criticism for the way it handled an interview with the leader of a recent Unite the Right rally in Washington D.C. And it’s raising questions about how and why newsrooms make decisions about covering controversial sources.

School districts across Florida are scrambling to meet a deadline to install security officers in every single public school.

We've all gotten an email or seen something online that seems a bit fishy.

Some people take the bait, but some check it out and often rely on a well-known online mythbuster called Snopes.com.

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