Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is a reporter at WUSF, as part of the Health News Florida team. Her assignment: distill policy and science so it makes sense on a personal level.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Mary has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636 on Twitter @MaryShedden or by email

Saying all police departments need to evolve to serve their communities better, Tampa Mayor Jane Castor on Friday announced the creation of a task force to recommend changes in city police policy and practice.

Excitement over Florida's presidential primary is waning, thanks to earlier voting contests in other states and the growing concerns over coronavirus.

The Florida Department of Health has announced six new cases of coronavirus, including a Broward County man who attended a recent conference in Tampa and a tourist visiting for Bike Week.

Despite not being officially allowed to live in Florida until 1763, Jewish people escaping expulsion and exclusion were among the earliest settlers of the state.

A new comprehensive history – "Jews of Florida: Centuries of Stories" – takes a look at that historic individuals who include politicians, business leaders, artists and Nobel Prize winners.

Hurricane Dorian struck the northern Bahamas as a catastrophic Category 5 storm Sunday, its record 185 mph winds ripping off roofs, overturning cars and tearing down power lines as hundreds hunkered down in schools, churches and shelters.

CBD is showing up more and more in Florida, from gas stations to grocery stories. It was being sold long before it became legal in the state on July 1. But there is a lot of confusion about whether it’s safe and what is legitimate.

Journalists from WUSF Public Media received three honors Saturday night at the annual Sunshine State Awards hosted by the Florida chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Florida’s budget was made official Friday afternoon, but not before Gov. Ron DeSantis issued vetoes for 25 projects and programs specifically for the Tampa Bay region.

This week on Florida Matters, we talk about zoning and how it affects the way our state manages growth.

It may sound mundane, but zoning and building regulations affect us intimately because they hit us where we live.


Daylina Miller, a multimedia reporter for WUSF Public Media and its Health News Florida project, was named the winner of a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in writing.

WUSF Public Media journalists won 11 honors Saturday night in the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Contest, including five first-place finishes and a second-place award for Station of the Year.

WUSF News will be highlighting America's affordable housing crunch and its impact here at home in an upcoming special report.

Several Tampa Bay area elections offices are extending their hours to help voters with contested mail-in ballots.

Follow along as NPR updates election results from the Tampa Bay area and other key Florida races.

The political stakes in Florida couldn’t get much higher.

On Tuesday, voters will pick a new governor and a U.S. Senator. Congressional and state legislative seats are up for grabs, as well as Attorney General and a slew of local offices. There’s also a long list of constitutional amendments -- on everything from gambling and voting rights to homestead taxes and vaping.

It’s been a year since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico. Recovery continues on the devastated island, but transitions are also happening here in Florida, where many residents evacuated and some have chosen to stay.

NPR recently received a firestorm of criticism for the way it handled an interview with the leader of a recent Unite the Right rally in Washington D.C. And it’s raising questions about how and why newsrooms make decisions about covering controversial sources.

School districts across Florida are scrambling to meet a deadline to install security officers in every single public school.

We've all gotten an email or seen something online that seems a bit fishy.

Some people take the bait, but some check it out and often rely on a well-known online mythbuster called Snopes.com.

Carson Cooper, the friendly, familiar voice that greeted WUSF 89.7 listeners as they started their weekday mornings these past 18 years, has died.

A civil rights attorney best known for representing the family of Trayvon Martin said Thursday that prosecutors should not apply Florida's Stand Your Ground law in a recent shooting death near Clearwater.

The most famous crossword puzzle in the world may belong to the New York Times. For more than 75 years, vocabulary junkies have been grabbing the paper and a pencil and taking a stab at the grid of empty squares.

WUSF stories about disabled veteran caregivers, female prisoners and the career of a college basketball coach recently won honors in the only national contest recognizing outstanding public radio news reporting at local stations.

WUSF All Things Considered Host Lisa Peakes has been honored for having the top radio newscast in the southeast United States in 2017.

The internet is talking this week about the death of 80-year-old Kathleen Dehmlow and her obituary in the Redwood Falls Minnesota Gazette, which was written and paid for by the woman’s own children.

In just 100 words, this tribute turned from announcement to anger, as it revealed a 60-year-old infidelity, and adult children who believe “the world is a better place without her.”

Protests are a staple of American democracy, but some journalism experts are worried about a recent story out of New Orleans, where a handful of paid actors attended a city council meeting about a controversial power plant.

Longtime Pinellas County Commissioner John Morroni died Sunday at the age of 63.

The Treasure Island Republican served on the commission since 2000. He also represented Pinellas County in the Florida House of Representatives for eight years, from 1992-2000.

Videos are an effective media known for its power to illicit emotion. And media consumers are learning the hard way that the images don’t have to be real to be convincing.

WUSF’s Robin Sussingham has been honored with a Regional Edward R. Murrow award for Feature Reporting.

At a time when the public’s trust of the media is on the decline, some local and national journalists with potential conflicts of interest are finding themselves in the spotlight.

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