Teresa Elena Frontado

Teresa Elena Frontado specializes in helping newsrooms navigate the complexities of digital transitions while incorporating new platforms and technology into their workflows. She has more than 20 years of experience working for media organizations in the United States and Latin America, including CBS Miami, Univision Network, El Nuevo Herald, El Nacional (Venezuela) and El Universal (Venezuela).

Teresa obtained her journalism degree from the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, and has two Master’s degrees: one from Tufts University and another one from the University of Miami. She was also a New York Times Fellow at the Maynard Institute for Leadership at Harvard University and a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan (Class of 2016), where she conducted research on social media strategies for legacy media. 

Teresa speaks four languages (Spanish, English, French and Portuguese) and is an avid reader. She has two wonderful kids and a dog who loves the beach almost as much as her. 

 

Fears of widespread immigration raids in South Florida appeared to dissipate without major actions on Sunday - but left migrant communities and advocates with renewed reason to come up with different strategies to deal with deportation of themselves or close family members.

In West Kendall, longtime immigrant rights advocate Nora Sandigo was praying she wouldn’t get a call on Sunday from any of her more than 1,500 children.

“Today we haven’t seen anything major,” she said in Spanish. “We hope it stays like this for the next few days.”

"Ni las moscas están [Not even the fleas are here]." That's how one shopkeeper at the Tropicana Flea Market in Miami's Allapattah neighborhood described the usually bustling place on Sunday. 

Authorities in Broward and Palm Beach counties are rejecting a new plan by Border Patrol that would deliver around 1,000 migrants every month to South Florida, arguing that it would burden the already overstretched resources of the counties and could put communities in danger.

One of the four diplomats working at the Venezuelan Consulate in Miami issued a video recognizing National Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as interim president of Venezuela.