Community

Stories about the people in our community.

Thursday on “Faith Matters,” our quarterly program that addresses issues through a faith perspective,  hosts Kyle Reese from Hendricks Avenue Baptist Church and Nancy Bronner, executive director of OneJax, discussed death with dignity. National healthcare organizations increasingly support medical aid in dying and reject the terms “suicide” and “assisted suicide” to describe it.  The national debate is growing, and six states have now made it legal for doctors to help terminally ill patients end their lives.  Fifteen additional states are considering similar legislation.

Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT

More attention is being paid to security at this weekend’s World of Nations Celebration at Met Park.

Our partner News4Jax reports security was beefed-up after a post on social media warned of possible danger at the 3-day event which started today.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has said that, after the shootings at Art Walk and the Jacksonville Landing in January, it’s taking all threats seriously.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

After several Duval students were caught with guns at school over the last two weeks, the School Board and the superintendent said Tuesday they’re working on an intervention plan.

Board Chair Paula Wright said board members have met with groups of students at each of the eight schools where guns have turned up this year.

choskinson@wjct.org / wjct

Shawn Liu with Changing Homelessness sent the first groups of clipboard carrying volunteers out around 4 a.m. to canvass downtown.

That's because, Wednesday was when the nationwide homeless census — called the point-in-time count — was taken of people living in shelters and on the streets in Jacksonville. 

Lindsey Kilbride

The front windows of Jacksonville’s City Hall are now displaying photos and stories about different parts of the city’s history.

One of those displays celebrates the historically African-American Durkeeville neighborhood and its connection to America’s pastime.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Jacksonville residents can now take a virtual tour of art around the city through an interactive online map.

It was created by the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville and there’s more to come.

Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT

A memorial service was held in Jacksonville on Wednesday to remember two dozen homeless men and women who died in 2016.

Doug Orange, 51, works as a certified recovery peer specialist at the Sulzbacher Center, which provides shelter and services to Jacksonville’s homeless.  Orange was homeless for five years in his 20s. He said remembering those who died is important.

As the debate continues about expanding the Human Rights Ordinance in Jacksonville to include protections for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender citizens, what role should faith play in the conversation?

That was the topic Thursday of “Faith Matters,” which is WJCT’s quarterly program taking a closer look at today’s issues through the lens of faith.

In 2012, an expanded Human Rights Ordinance, which included protections for the LGBT community, went before the Jacksonville City Council. The ordinance divided the faith community. It wound up narrowly failing.

The Main Street Bridge is shown from across the St. Johns River. In the background is some of the Jacksonville skyline.
Blake Allen

The Florida Department of Transportation is investigating damage to Jacksonville’s Main Street Bridge after a river cruise ship crashed into it Friday evening.

The City Rescue Mission’s New Life Inn shelter hosted a Thanksgiving feast Wednesday for Jacksonville’s homeless. Between 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., more than 1,000 people were expected to be fed.

Around 100 volunteers from all over Jacksonville worked to provide the meals. Some even cooked the turkeys over the weekend.

“We are privileged to get to serve what we call our ‘invisible neighbors’ on the street,” said City Rescue Mission Executive Director Penny Kievet. “About 120 turkeys, actually 123 to be exact, were cooked for today.”

cat toys, dog toys
Rethreaded

The Jacksonville non-profit Rethreaded is issuing a challenge for shoppers: Support survivors of human trafficking with your purchases this holiday season.

Jeffrey Beall / Flickr

A Jacksonville community group that meets weekly to sing hymns in a Riverside bar is asking for help putting together lunches for people working on Thanksgiving.

Tim Kerr and his wife started a Beers and Hymns night at the bar The Silver Cow more than a year ago.


Katie Rice

An adoptive Jacksonville mother is asking the community for help making the holiday season brighter for her daughter with special needs.

Katie Rice said her 2-year-old daughter, Ansley, has a host of disabilities including microcephaly, cerebral palsy and seizures. She continues to defy odds, hitting milestones like her first birthday that doctors never thought she would.

To keep that momentum going, the family is hoping to buy a wheelchair accessible van to make sure Ansley makes it to her procedures.

Rehm To Announce Replacement On Wednesday's Show

Nov 15, 2016
Contributed Photo / NPR

As many of you might know, after 37 years behind the mic Diane Rehm will retire at the end of the year.

We want you to be among the first to find out who will replace Rehm in 2017. Be sure to tune in at 10 a.m. Wednesday for the first hour of "The Diane Rheme Show." 

Kayla Davis / WJCT News

Jacksonville held its annual Veterans Day Parade downtown on Friday.

Armed with colorful floats, several companies and groups took to the streets of downtown Jacksonville to show their appreciation for veterans.


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