Michelle Corum

Manager, Radio Reading Service / Host, "Morning Edition"

Michelle Corum joined WJCT as "Morning Edition" host in late 2012 and brought with her more than 10 years of experience as an announcer and reporter for public radio stations in Lawrence, Kansas, and Interlochen, Michigan.

Her news and feature stories have aired on NPR and the Great Lakes Radio Consortium, and her anchoring and reporting have been recognized for numerous broadcasting awards, including the Florida AP Broadcasters Best Radio Newscast of 2015.

Michelle earned a Master of Science in Administration (MSA) degree from Central Michigan University in 2000 and holds a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Troy State University in Alabama.

In addition to coordinating volunteers for WJCT's Radio Reading Service for seeing-impaired listeners, she is also on the faculty of American Public University, and she teaches communication courses online.

Ways to Connect

Michelle Corum / WJCT

Debris from fallen trees and washed-up trash from the river still litter the ground months after the Category 3 storm brushed the First Coast. Broken boards from the dock are scattered like leaves. A gate blocks off the dock and bears a large warning sign: “Keep off dock under repair,” in big red letters.

The remaining few yards behind the fence are dangerous and cannot be used.

Walter Jones Historical Park in Mandarin was home to the County Dock, but sustained extensive damage from the hurricane last October.

Sign hanging on fence.
Michelle Corum / WJCT News

A special education school, just east of downtown Jacksonville, is depending on donations to be able to serve more students.

The 25-year-old North Florida School of Special Education sits on several acres tucked away in Arlington, with enough space for a butterfly garden, an amphitheatre and a green house. 

Here, special education teachers work with students who have mild to moderate intellectual disabilities like autism or Down syndrome. The nonprofit school offers art and music classes, a track for exercise, and an urban farm where kids learn how to grow food.

River Club dining room decorated for a wedding
Gate Hospitality

The University Club on Jacksonville’s Southbank is closing this month after nearly 50 years of offering its members full-service dining with a spectacular skyline view.


Michelle Corum / WJCT News

Florida’s 6th U.S. House District runs from Jacksonville’s southern suburbs southward to New Smyrna Beach. Two-term Republican incumbent Congressman Ron DeSantis is running for reelection there.

Michelle Corum / WJCT News

Fleming Island Republican Glo Smith and former Democratic State Sen. Al Lawson, of Tallahassee, debated before Jacksonville’s Southside Business Men’s Club Wednesday, each making the case why he or she should succeed Corrine Brown in Congressional District 5.

Michelle Corum / WJCT News

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has declared a state of emergency ahead of Hurricane Matthew’s expected approach. He is urging all residents of Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach and Jacksonville Beach, as well as all residents who live in evacuation zones A and B, to evacuate as soon as possible.

Michelle Corum / WJCT

A one-room schoolhouse built in 1898 to educate the children of freed slaves opened as a museum in Jacksonville on Saturday. Its new home is Walter Jones Historical Park in Mandarin.

Two Jacksonville Public Library employees are hoping to help blind patrons feel more secure about visiting the building’s restrooms.

Imagine going into a public bathroom, and you don’t know where the soap dispensers or the stalls are. Elisha Zuaro of St. Augustine can identify with that. She’s without sight and has to use her hearing to figure things out.

 

“I try to walk in and listen to see, ‘OK, let me hear where the sink is, where someone’s running water—or I listen for the toilets’ flushing; you know, to kind of orient myself.”

Florida Students who are blind or have low vision met in Jacksonville Thursday for an annual Braille reading and writing competition.

For many purposes, Braille has been replaced by smartphone apps and other technologies.

But the Braille system, invented in 1821 by Louis Braille, is not dead yet.

Remember those spelling tests where the teacher called out the word and you wrote it down?  Blind children have spelling tests too when they’re learning Braille.

Wikimedia Commons

Florida is one of only three states where county public health departments employ obstetricians for pregnant women.

It’s a legacy of the 1990s, when Florida’s infant mortality rate was one of the worst in the nation. But this safety net is eroding.

 


people using canes to walk down the sidewalk
Braille Institute

Getting from point A to point B safely can be challenging for those living with blindness. Often, they use a white cane to help them navigate streets, and they want to remind drivers to be on the lookout for them.

Michelle Corum / WJCT News

Although the overall job market has improved, the U.S. Labor Department finds an increasing number of Americans with disabilities are unemployed. 

Three women living with blindness in Jacksonville are searching for jobs, and not finding any. 

Michelle Corum / WJCT News

Although final crop reports won’t be available until early next year, most of Florida's large-scale blueberry growers say it’s been a pretty good year.

But one “u-pick” blueberry operation in Jacksonville is being affected by consecutive days of nearly 100-degree heat and dry conditions.


The polls in the Duval First Unitary Election opened at 7 this morning. Thousands are expected to turn out in Duval County to cast their vote for mayor, sheriff, City Council and election supervisor.

If you're headed to the polls today, make sure to bring your ID with you. The line for the polls close at 7 p.m.

The Blood Alliance / Facebook

Jacksonville’s Blood Alliance is retiring one of its Bloodmobiles, but it’s not being put out to pasture. It will keep pumping… in Haiti.

The Blood Alliance is giving a Bloodmobile, a gift worth $230,000, to a group called Zanmi Lasante where it will be used as a mobile Health Clinic serving more than three million people.

Odette Struys of The Blood Alliance says an air-conditioned mobile clinic can help Zanmi Lasante Haiti reach more patients.

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