Ryan Benk

REPORTER / HOST "Indie Endeavour"

Ryan Benk comes to WJCT from Tallahassee, where he worked as a news researcher and reporter for NPR affiliate WFSU. Originally from Miami, he graduated with a bachelor's in English literature from Florida State University. During his time in Tallahassee, Ryan also worked as a policy and research analyst for legislative-research firm LobbyTools before returning to public radio at WJCT.

Ryan also edited fiction and poetry for Miami-Dade College's Miambiance magazine, and he produced a short film titled "The Writer."

When he’s not tracking down news, Ryan likes watching films, writing fiction and poetry, and exploring Florida's natural beauty.

Ryan is also the host of "Indie Endeavor."

Ray Hollister / WJCT News

A settlement between disability rights nonprofits, the Department of Justice and Jacksonville is well on its way to becoming law after passing its final City Council committee this Tuesday.

The full council is expected next week to approve the agreement that helps the city avoid trial for violating the federal Fair Housing Act.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Florida Governor Rick Scott was in Jacksonville Tuesday to celebrate the grand opening of a new aluminum bottle plant on the Westside.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Baker County Commissioners will decide Tuesday whether a mining company can move a portion of a state road and expand its operation close to Macclenny.


Fight for the Future

President Donald Trump signed a bill last month overturning a ban on internet providers’ selling customer’s browsing histories.

Now, billboards are popping up around the country targeting members of Congress who voted for the measure.

One of them is Jacksonville Republican John Rutherford.


Pressly Pratt / WJCT News

Updated 6:30 p.m.

Former Congresswoman Corrine Brown has been found guilty in 18 of 22 counts of conspiracy, wire/mail fraud and tax fraud for her role in a scam that bilked $833,000 from donors who thought sham charity One Door for Education was awarding scholarships to disadvantaged students.

Only $1,200 actually made it to students’ education.


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