Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Within one week, Governor Rick Scott not only signed a gun safety bill into law, he also approved the budget, which includes millions of dollars for school safety purposes. Still, that didn’t prevent the National Rifle Association from filing a federal lawsuit against a provision in the new safety law. And, on the one month mark of the Parkland mass school shooting, thousands of kids across the nation walked out of their schools. Some Parkland families also asked officials to put ideas on the ballot to ban assault rifles and have universal background checks, and lawmakers in Washington D.C. may be moving forward on gun safety bills of their own.

St. Patrick’s Day falls on Saturday this year, and AAA officials say they’re expecting to see much more drivers on the roadways. They’re offering Floridians a safe ride home to avoid fatal crashes.

The Florida Legislature has passed a bill that includes designating a highway after a former North Florida Republican Senator who died last year.

Thanks to a $1.1 million grant, black owned businesses across the state can now apply for a loan through a program administered by the Florida A&M University Federal Credit Union. It’s part of a partnership with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.

A bill giving a tax exemption on diapers and feminine hygiene products has cleared its first Florida Senate committee.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is marking its 50th year in existence. In 1967, the Florida legislature merged the duties and responsibilities of several state criminal justice organizations to create the Bureau of Law Enforcement—its former name. FDLE Commissioner Rick Swearingen says at the time, the agency had more than 90 members and a budget of $1.5 million.

Florida wildlife officials have unveiled a pilot program in the Florida Panhandle as part of their latest lionfish removal efforts.

The news is constantly changing about the Zika virus. Federal funding and prevention efforts have been a huge part of the discussion this week. And, with Florida leading the nation with close to 90 cases of the mosquito-borne disease, the state’s congressional leaders say it’s even more crucial that something is done.

Highlighting Florida State University’s research efforts, North Florida Congresswoman Gwen Graham is calling on Congress to fully fund similar home grown efforts to combat the Zika virus.

Families who want to rebury their loved ones who initially were buried at the now-closed Dozier School for Boys will be reimbursed, after Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law doing just that.  That’s the Panhandle school associated with a history of alleged abuse.

A bill making changes to Florida’s 10-20-Life law is now heading to the House floor.

Some Florida lawmakers are looking to fix what they call an outdated law related to saying the “Pledge of Allegiance” in schools.

A Florida lawmaker is hoping to bring back a discussion about the best way to prevent skin cancer in younger people. Her measure bans minors from using tanning beds.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is thanking Governor Rick Scott for pledging millions of dollars to help process thousands of untested rape kits.

A bill aimed at eliminating the unintended consequences of Florida’s 10-20-Life law in self-defense claims unanimously passed its first House panel Wednesday.