Tech

News about computers, smartphones, gadgets, apps, the Internet and the tech industry.

The U.K.'s Prince Harry took over editing duties for Wednesday at BBC Radio 4's Today program. And he managed to snag a rather high-profile guest: Barack Obama.

The full audio of the interview is available here for the next six days. The interview was taped in September during the Invictus Games in Toronto, an event created by Harry for wounded, injured or ill servicemen and veterans.

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This month, more than a thousand students gathered at Yale University. They gathered on the basketball courts inside a huge gym and they sat down to code.

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Since 2010, Library of Congress has been archiving every single public tweet: Yours, ours, the president's.

But today, the institution announced it will no longer archive every one of our status updates, opinion threads, and "big if true"s. As of Jan. 1, the library will only acquire tweets "on a very selective basis."

This year, deep inside a mountain, North Korea detonated a giant nuclear bomb.

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This fall Nintendo re-released the Super NES Classic, a mini-version of one of its first consoles from the 1990s. It sold out in stores in just a few hours — the latest example of the craze for retro-games and their hardware.

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This week in the Russia investigations: The Mueller Wars rage behind the scenes, Republicans may get their Clinton uranium inquiry, and the Senate Intelligence Committee looks into Russia and the Jill Stein campaign.

The sharks are circling

President Trump says Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller is safe. Reporters shouted a question about whether he was planning to try to fire him:

"I'm not," Trump said Dec. 17.

For many of the estimated 170,000 children who go online for the first time each day, the virtual universe will offer new possibilities to connect with the world — and access to unbounded knowledge and services.

But the virtual world can also present dangers. And kids who don't yet have the awareness to navigate the Web safely could fall prey to those threats.

Laurence Chandy, UNICEF's director of data, research and policy, says that while a third of all Internet users are kids, consumer protections don't always have children in mind.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

I'm Ari Shapiro with news that you're not crazy. Apple has confirmed something that iPhone users believed for a long time. When your iPhone gets older, it slows down. And this often happens around the same time the company releases a fancy new phone.

Confirming iPhone owners' suspicions that Apple purposefully slows the operation of older phones, Apple says that it does just that — and that slowing down processors makes it easier for old batteries to perform after they've begun to lose capacity.

A new study describes, in detail, the stiffness of beetle penises, which might serve as inspiration for people who design medical catheters.

The industry has long struggled with an engineering problem: How do you keep a very thin tube flexible enough to snake into hard-to-reach places but rigid enough to withstand insertion? Plus, there is the problem of buckling — when a thin tube crimps so fluids can't flow through it anymore.

At NPR, we know there's a difference between the news that you listen to, and the stories you love.

This year, there was a lot of news that grabbed your attention: several major hurricanes; a new president in office who is ripping up the conventions of Washington; and terrorist attacks both at home and abroad. But we also reported on stories that help us understand how to make our lives better and what makes us human beings tick. The former types of stories we feel we need to know about, the latter we enjoy knowing about.

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