Heather Schatz

Talk Show Producer

Heather spent close to 10 years at CBS News in New York City, where she worked for CBS Network Radio, CBS This Morning and The Early Show, producing news and feature stories for television and radio. While there, she was nominated for a national Emmy Award for a feature series and received National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Certificates of Recognition for the reporting of the September 11 events and the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster.

Since returning to Florida in 2007, Heather has worked as the communications director for Best Buddies International and the National YoungArts Foundation and as a communications consultant for a number of businesses. 

She is also a long-standing member of the Writer’s Guild of America, East, and contributes to Edible Northeast Florida magazine. Heather has a master's degree in journalism and mass communications from New York University and a bachelor's degree in public policy from Cornell University. 

Heather lives at the Beaches with her husband and two children.

STEVEN MARTIN / FLICKR.COM

Jacksonville’s Charter Revision Commission will hold a public town hall at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, October 17, to ask what changes residents want in their city’s governance.

SPACEPORTCAMDEN.US

Plans are in the works to bring a new spaceport to Camden County, Georgia.

HEATHER SCHATZ / WJCT NEWS

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens' newest exhibit, Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection, opens to the public this Friday, Oct. 18.

Heather Schatz/WJCT

City Councilman Matt Carlucci joined us to discuss new legislation to replenish a trust fund for historic preservation, as well as several other local issues, including the possible JEA sale.

RYAN KETTERMAN / VISIT JACKSONVILLE

There is a lot of attention focused on Downtown Jacksonville these days. Between the new Ford on Bay, First Baptist Church’s decision to put about 90% of their properties on the market, plans for a mixed-use development at the old Independent Life Tower, and JEA’s plans for a new headquarters the urban core is changing. 

Bill Bortzfield/WJCT News

Amendment 4 restored voting rights to more than a million Florida residents with a felony conviction.

JEA's downtown Jacksonville headquarters
Bill Bortzfield / WJCT News

JEA, Jacksonville's publicly-owned utility, announced Monday it has received bids from 16 private companies. Next it will evaluate the bids as the utility continues on a path of potentially recommending a sale of all or part of the operation to a private vendor.

DREW MCKISSICK / FLICKR

A push is underway in Duval County that organizers claim would improve the election process  and voter turnout for Jacksonville's municipal elections.

wh.gov

This week we took a closer look at what President Donald Trump wants to do with Medicare, and how it could affect the millions of Floridians who count on it for health care, with:

Heather Schatz/WJCT

Mapping Jax, a new local movement sparked by a rush of downtown demolitions, is asking the city to think more creatively about how we build the urban core.

On today’s show, we looked at how the impeachment inquiry is playing with Florida voters. 

Bill Bortzfield/WJCT News

Florida voters passed Amendment 4 last year to restore voting rights for 1.4 million people in the state who had a felony conviction but had served their prison sentences. 

OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PORTRAIT / VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

President Trump is facing an impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. We took a look at this historic turn of events with Michael Binder, UNF associate director of political science.

Terrell Hogan Lawfirm

More First Coast residents are filing lawsuits against Monsanto, the makers of Roundup, the world’s most popular weed killer. They claim it caused their non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. 

Heather Schatz/WJCT

A group of Duval County parents and grandparents are suing the City of Jacksonville for failing to put the School Board’s proposed half-cent sales tax on voters’ ballots this year. 

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