First Coast Success

In the wake of the Wells Fargo scandal, we heard from University of North Florida professor Paul Fadil. He and his colleague Bruce Fortado authored a study several years ago that predicted problems banks might face in the drive to find new customers and revenue . In our latest edition of First Coast Success, Karen Brune Mathis spoke with Daily’s founder Aubrey Edge. Host Melissa Ross talked to Rock Steady Boxing — Amelia Island co-founders Mary Anne Sharer and Guy Petty about their work with Parkinson’s patients and Cole Pepper told us about another Jaguars loss and a sad sports weekend. 


Democratic National Convention

As the Democratic National Convention kicks off in Philadelphia, an unusual question is capturing the attention of cyberspecialists, Russia experts and Democratic Party leaders: Is Vladimir Putin trying to meddle in the American presidential election?

A Wikileaks release on Friday of some 20,000 stolen emails from DNC computer servers has intensified discussion of the potential role of Russian intelligence agencies in disrupting the 2016 campaign.

Chasing the Dream

The deplorable conditions at the local low-income housing project Eureka Gardens captured national headlines when it came to light residents were living with dangerous mold, leaky gas pipes, and dilapidated stairs. But those conditions aren’t unique to that complex. 

Many local, low-income residents deal with these conditions every day.

For poor people in Jacksonville, finding housing that’s both affordable and livable can be hard to come by. Finding shelter often means settling for dangerously run-down apartments and dealing with the constant threat of eviction.

WJCT’s "Chasing the Dream" series, launching this week on 89.9 FM, examines what housing is available when you’re poor and what’s being done to help against a public housing system that’s underfunded nationwide.

We discuss the issue with WJCT News Director Jessica Palombo, and attorneys Katherine Hanson and Jeff Haynie of Jacksonville Area Legal Aid.

El Faro

There’s still a lot to learn about the tragic loss of the El Faro.

The Jacksonville-based cargo ship that sank last October at sea during Hurricane Joaquin, killing all 33 people on board.

Two weeks of hearings recently wrapped up looking into the cause of the El Faro disaster.

And it was a sometimes contentious proceeding, with one investigator called the sinking "a colossal failure" of management before he apologized and took back the comment.

Investigators do want to confirm what mistakes were made, and also explore ways to prevent a similar tragedy from happening again.

We recap the hearings with Jacksonville maritime attorney Rod Sullivan and WJCT News reporter Ryan Benk.


Juvenile Diversion

Every year, police arrest more than 2,000 juveniles in Duval County. Nearly half are under the age of 15.

Some are arrested for serious offensives but many get in trouble due to bad influences and immaturity, and this contact with the criminal justice system can affect their lives for years afterwards.

This has led to a strong focus in recent  years on juvenile diversion programs to give them a chance to clean their record. In Duval County, four of these programs serve more than 1,200 children each year.

Tess Duvall, education, children and families reporter for the Florida Times-Union, has been taking an in-depth look into these program and their effectiveness for a series of articles running in the paper this week. She joins us to discuss them.


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