WJCT News

machine mock-up
Georgia-Pacific

Georgia-Pacific To Add Jobs At Palatka Mill After Installing $400 Million Machine

The Georgia-Pacific paper company, the largest private employer in Putnam County, announced on Friday it’s expanding its Palatka operation with a giant new machine. The $400 million piece of equipment is expected to help the company add more than 120 jobs.

Read More

Mourners Remember Otto Warmbier At Hometown Funeral

Throngs of mourners paid their final respects to Otto Warmbier Thursday at a public funeral at the high school he attended near Cincinnati. Just four years ago, Warmbier graduated from the school as the salutatorian. The 22-year-old University of Virginia student was detained in North Korea for 17 months and died on Monday, shortly after he returned to the United States in a coma. "It doesn't really feel real yet," his former soccer teammate Grady Beerck said, according to The Associated...

Read More

Local News

University of North Florida

The majority of Florida’s public universities will split a $245 million pot of state money this year based on their annual performance reviews.  The University of North Florida, however, did not make the cut.

machine mock-up
Georgia-Pacific

The Georgia-Pacific paper company, the largest private employer in Putnam County, announced on Friday it’s expanding its Palatka operation with a giant new machine.

The $400 million piece of equipment is expected to help the company add more than 120 jobs.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

An army of volunteers will descend on downtown Jacksonville’s Hemming Park Saturday to begin planting gardens and making other improvements.

Friends of Hemming Park CEO Bill Prescott walked through the park Friday morning, stopping next to the Laura Street fountain. It’s surrounded by a chain-link fence.


  Today on “First Coast Connect,” our weekly Media Roundtable panel included Florida Times-Union reporter David Bauerlein, David Cawton from the Financial News and Daily Record, Folio Weekly editor Claire Goforth and A.G. Gancarski (01:33) from Florida Politics. We heard about a rally Saturday in St. Mary’s, Georgia, to protest proposed development on Cumberland Island with Alex Kearns (33:41) with St. Mary’s EarthKeepers. Thrasher-Horne Center executive director Denton Yockey (41:10) told us about what’s in store for their upcoming Broadway Orange Park season and we heard a live in-studio performance by the Sapphire Quartet (46:09). 

Wikimedia Commons

On this episode of Redux, we explore the question: Where should our money go?

This is also the topic of our upcoming live show, "Community Thread," which is a discussion on how your tax dollars are being spent, including a look at all the money going into Everbank Stadium.

Then, with the revival of downtown Jacksonville already underway, some folks are hoping the River City doesn’t neglect its past. And we’ll bring you two stories on the latest city project that could transform the area’s urban core, and what it possibly means to Jacksonville’s first suburb, LaVilla.

We also bring you an update on the One Spark crowdfunding festival.


More News

Sign up for WJCT First Read

Get the most important stories from WJCT News and NPR delivered straight to your inbox every weekday morning and breaking news when it happens

Local Weather

Follow WJCT on Twitter

Podcast

WJCT News Podcast

National News

Pakistan was hit with a spate of violence in several cities Friday, leaving the country to cope with the deaths of dozens of people and scores more injured. In twin bombings at a market in Parachinar, a car bombing in Quetta and a shooting in Karachi, more than 80 people were killed in the bloodshed.

A special American Black Journal episode: 67'

Jun 24, 2017

On the next American Black Journal: The new superintendent of the Detroit Public Schools Community District, Dr. Nikolai Vitti, talks with Stephen Henderson about his priorities for the district, teachers, academics and student enrollment. Plus, the long-awaited "Detroit 1967: Perspectives" exhibition opens at the Detroit Historical Museum. Stephen talks with the project's director, Marlowe Stoudamire, about what museum visitors will experience at the exhibit.   Detroit 67: Perspectives opens to the public on June 24th.

Dado Ruvic/Reuters

There’s a running joke in the cybersecurity industry that squirrels pose a greater threat to the power grid than hackers. 

But that’s changing. 

Russia has been able to shut off parts of the power grid to cause massive blackouts in Ukraine on two separate occasions. 

And the technology they’ve developed is highly sophisticated and adaptable, which means that any country could be the next target of Russian hackers.

Oh sure, you could argue there are other, more important things happening in the world. And frankly, you'd be right. (For those things, by the way — which some people, in somber tones, might call newsplease see here.)

But sometimes, you just need to watch a big gorilla dance in a small pool.

The Chaldean Deportation Protest - June 2017

Bill Kubota, One Detroit/Detroit Journalism Cooperative

 

<iframe frameborder="0" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PgKMAhBX-XM?rel=0 " width="640"></iframe>

  Lafayette Boulevard in front of the Federal Courthouse in downtown Detroit was closed to traffic and packed with hundreds of protesters June 21st, calling for the end of deportations after the Immigration and Customs Enforcement rounded up more than 100 Chaldeans with criminal records two weekends ago.

More News

Florida Department of Law Enforcement has released more information about what they're calling Operation Reveal The Deal: 

Black smoke rose over the Vatican this morning.. a signal that the cardinals' conclave in Rome has not yet chosen a new pope.

The new pontiff will replace retiring Pope Benedict the 16th, and lead 1.2 billion Catholics around the  world.

He’ll also face deep divisions within the church and a scandal-plagued Vatican hierarchy.

Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll Resigns

Mar 13, 2013
Miami Herald

Update 10:30 am: The Governor's Office has confirmed both Matt Dixon's story from the Florida Times Union and Tia Mitchell's piece in the Tampa Bay Times. The Governor will answer questions at 3:00 this afternoon at the Capitol.

Kevin Meerschaert

The Jacksonville City Council has approved legislation authorizing a  long delayed plan to overhaul the old Federal Courthouse to house the State Attorney’s office.

Funding for the 26-million dollar project was always part of the 350-million dollar Courthouse project, but ran into design delays.

The original developer was dropped and the project was rebid but none of the new bids came in under budget.

Channel 4 News/WJXT

Fraternal Order of Police President Nelson Cuba is among the local figures arrested as part of a multi-state gambling investigation into the Allied Veterans of the World and its internet cafes.

Cuba and his second-in-command, Robbie Freitas have reportedly been arrested on racketeering charges. Three executives with Allied Veterans were also arrested including the head of the organization, Jerry Bass, executive Mike Davis, and attorney Kelly Mathis.

According to Federal documents, the charges stem from an investigation into how much money Allied Veterans gave to charity. The organization claimed their facilities were fundraising centers,  but the investigators say they were Internet casinos operating in violation of Florida’s gambling laws. While Allied Veterans said it was donating 70% or more of its proceeds to charity, authorities say they really only gave about 2% of  profits to veterans’ causes.

The investigation is being conducted by the IRS and the United States Secret Service, with help from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and several local agencies in the state including the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office.

They received search warrants for 51 Allied Veterans properties in Florida including 8 in Duval County, 2 in Nassau County and 1 each in Flagler, Clay, Putnam and St. Johns counties.

The local chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police issued a statement saying that the arrests of its top leaders were related to the mens’ private business and unrelated to their duties with the F-O-P.

Robin Wright

  The events of the Arab Spring were momentous and for many, exciting to watch as they unfolded in the Middle East. So what now?

That's the domain of acclaimed author and foreign correspondent Robin Wright. She's in town this week to discuss her book, Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Muslim World.

Three Jacksonville City Council Committees have deferred a vote on legislation that would have waived the city’s mobility fee for three years.

Council members want to try and reach a short term compromise, while a task force is formed to take a longer look at the fee’s formula and structure.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) - A Senate committee has essentially killed Gov. Rick Scott's plan to expand Medicaid coverage to roughly 1 million of Florida's poorest residents
      Instead, the committee proposed Monday that the state adopt a managed care system that requires patients have a copayment.
      Sen. Joe Negron says he hopes the state can eventually exit from the Medicaid system entirely and called this proposal the beginning of a transformation. Lawmakers also discussed using state funds to help with copays.

New research from the University of Washington suggests that better economic conditions and healthier lifestyles in St. Johns County have led to a longer life expectancy for residents than in neighboring Putnam County.

Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown joined local environmental officials today (Monday) to encourage local residents to participate in Saturday’s annual St. John’s River Cleanup.

This is the 18th year for the event, which encourages participants to  pick up litter from natural and urban areas.

From the Northbank Riverwalk, Brown said the St. Johns River is the heart of the city of Jacksonville.

Pages