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UF campus
University of Florida via Twitter

University Of Florida Says No To White Nationalist Speaker

The University of Florida is refusing to allow white nationalist leader Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month, citing “serious concerns” about safety in the aftermath of a deadly weekend clash in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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UF campus
University of Florida via Twitter

The University of Florida is refusing to allow white nationalist leader Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month, citing “serious concerns” about safety in the aftermath of a deadly weekend clash in Charlottesville, Virginia.

downtown Jacksonville skyline
Rob Bixby via Flickr

A day after Jacksonville’s City Council President called for removing Confederate monuments, Mayor Lenny Curry said white supremacists are already talking about protesting.

  Today on “First Coast Connect,” we heard about a study from the University of Florida regarding rising sea levels from co-author Dr. Arnoldo Valle-Levinson (01:04). Our “Moveable Feast” segment featured Ocean 60 restaurant in Atlantic Beach (29:08). We learned about an international fraud lawsuit filed in Jacksonville on behalf of local former CTI Logistics employees with attorney Jack Webb and former CTI Director of Human Relations Mike Nicoletti (37:11), and we heard about the Sisters of Hope House on Jacksonville’s Westside with board members Carla Garrigan and Amy Kilgore (45:36). 

 

beach chairs
Pixabay

Florida continues to see record numbers of visitors while the state's tourism-marketing agency has been forced to reinvent its approach after months of legislative turmoil.

UF campus building
Steven Martin via Flickr

The University of Florida is coordinating with local and state law-enforcement officials in anticipation of the potential appearance in Gainesville of a white nationalist leader affiliated with this weekend's deadly confrontation in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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National News

Are Helicopter Parents Ruining Summer Camp?

Jul 24, 2017

"It beeped in the envelope. That's how we knew."

Leslie Conrad is the director of Clemson Outdoor Lab in Pendleton, S.C., which runs several different camps during the summer. Clemson bans cellphones and other electronic devices for campers.

That makes sense. We traditionally think of summer camp as a place to swim in the lake and weave friendship bracelets, not text and play video games.

Alaa Al-Faqir/Reuters

The Central Intelligence Agency is shutting down its program to support rebels fighting against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, The Washington Post reported.

Citing unnamed US officials, the Post said the four-year-old covert operation has had limited impact, especially since Russian forces stepped in to support Assad in 2015.

The radicalization of a surfer dude

Jul 24, 2017
Mike Blake/Reuters

The subculture of southern California surfers has long fascinated novelist Laleh Khadivi. 

She calls those who ride the waves there a "tribe unto themselves."

"These surfers have found their God, it is the ocean, and they will come every day and pay homage to it," she says. 

At Least 9 Dead, Dozens More Found In Tractor-Trailer In San Antonio

Jul 23, 2017

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET Monday

At least 10 people have died after being crammed into the back of a tractor-trailer and traveling under scorching conditions, officials say, in an update on a case of apparent human smuggling.

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ikaika Erik Kang is facing four charges of attempting to provide material support to ISIS related to accusations of sharing secret information and supplying a drone and other gear to undercover FBI agents he believed were affiliated with the terrorist group.

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photo by Beth Meckley

    The Streetlights will be coming back on in Jacksonville’s industrial and commercial areas under legislation proposed by Mayor Alvin Brown.
      The lights were shut off last year due to budget cuts.
          Mayor Brown says funding comes from unspent dollars from the previous fiscal year.
         There’s also money in the bill to maintain city right-of-ways, help the Fraternal Order of Police pay for job related education expenses, and to boost funding for economic development near Jacksonville International Airport and in Northwest Jacksonville.

Rick Wilson/The Florida Times-Union

 It's a big-picture look at the future transportation needs of the entire First Coast.

The Northeast Florida Regional Transportation Study Commission (RTSC), is working with the seven counties of the First Coast to develop a better transportation grid for the coming decades.

We spoke with Director Brad Thoburn and Commissioner Bob Rhodes about the organization's long-term goals.

They begin with securing funding from state lawmakers to develop a regional, multimodal transportation plan.

Do you have what it takes to navigate the political swampland of Florida and come out clean?

WLRN and the Miami Herald have partnered to create a  new interactive experience that will allow you to put your political integrity to the test.  After a cutthroat election, you have officially begun your career as a Florida politician.

Now it is up to you to make the right political and personal choices.

Reuters

Demolition continues today on a home in Seffner, near Tampa, where a man was killed when sinkhole opened up under his bedroom. The sad and frightening story of a man swallowed up by the Earth as he slept has most Floridians paying more attention to sinkholes, but they're actually a fairly common occurrence in the state.

    Jacksonville has seen a sharp increase in the number of pedestrian and bicyclist traffic deaths in the past year.    
       Local law and traffic enforcement agencies are teaming to raise awareness of the problem and share how to avoid such accidents.
Sheriff John Rutherford says pedestrian traffic deaths jumped 39-percent in Jacksonville last year. Deaths of bicyclists jumped 80-percent.
       He says the main problem is that people lack awareness of their surroundings.

          A group of downtown Jacksonville business and community leaders are kicking off a project to enhance the north bank and south bank riverwalks on the St. Johns River.
       The Riverwalk Project will present its initiative during next month’s One Spark festival.
          The project will create an app and website that would stream information about health, the environment, arts and entertainment and Jacksonville’s history.



         Jacksonville’s Downtown Investment Authority says it does not think the city should waive a fee on new construction.
         The legislation is to be discussed and possibly voted on next  week in three city council committees.
         The mobility fee is paid by developers and is used to pay for transportation projects. It’s designed to encourage redevelopment close to the city’s core and limit sprawl.

Jacksonville.com

Military flyovers, a favorite moment during Jaguars games, could be a victim of the sequester. USA Today reports that if the budget cuts go into effect, it's possible that the flyovers will end, at least for this fiscal year and possibly beyond.

Florida National Guard

    Governor Rick Scott is slamming President Barack Obama and Congress for not getting a budget deal done to replace the sequester set to begin on Friday.
         Scott says because politicians in Washington aren’t doing their jobs, Floridians may lose theirs.       
        Governor Scott says Sequestration makes no sense because it uses a meat cleaver approach in cutting spending instead of a scalpel.
         He says it will have a dramatic impact on Florida’s military bases and defense industry.

CEO of Shands
Shands Jacksonville

He's the new CEO of Shands Jacksonville, and Russ Armistead has a full plate- dealing with everything from turf battles over trauma care in Northeast Florida to a planned Medicaid expansion in the state that will greatly impact Shands, the "safety-net" hospital for the region.

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